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AG88导航网【ag88.shop】全讯真人 XrNpa7QBText sizeA/a】AaIt tur【n\s out, the Duke of S【us\sex/ is/ an amazin\g phot\ogr】ap\her. And he ch\ose Eart/h D/ay to】 give a proof of that, as【 h【e posted 8 of his s/tunning 【images about natu/re on Inst【agram, in ord【/er to sh【are his environm/ental 【point of view. "Today is #earthday - 【an】 opportun】ity to learn ab/out, celebrate】 【and continue】 to safegua\rd our planet/, our 】home【," the caption reads. Fro】m critically【\ 【en\dang】e/red /species to【】 \plas/tic】 pollution,\ /the selection provide【s\ an ove【rview of today's most pressing en】v/ironme【ntal issu【es./Prince】 Harry's comm\itmen/t to protecting/ \the env\ironment is alrea】dy widely known. The Duke and Duchess of Sus/s\ex even used their own wedding day as an action ag\ai\n/st ocean pollution by as】king wel\l-wis【hers to support cer\t/ain\ cha【rities instead of offering gifts. In the me【antime, Meghan, Duchess of S【ussex ha/s already【\ /been recogniz【ed f/or her 【ethical fashion choices. The /ro】yal household is also com/mitte【d t【o reducing its en\vironmental impact\, amon\g othe\r measures, the Buckingham Palace has anno】unced 】some change/s last\ year】, such as cu\tti】ng back on【 the use of plast\ics, in ord\er】 to figh】t agai/【nst 】plasti】c pollution.Click on the【 video above to/ see the /ph【oto\s ta/ken by Prin】ce Harry.S\hare this article \ More from【 lifexgco

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u30lMont Saint M】ichel\ recla/ims/ isl】a/nd-li【ke character \after year/s of major constru\ctionbbXuFlUC

2HS3“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000/Cavi【ar/ with c/ompassion is set to revolutionize\ the 】d/elicacy】/ twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagspIfC

OiRfThe climat【e em】erg】e/ncy is 】no】t th/e【 only\ en【viron\】me【ntal issu\e th\e world【 i】s strug\/\gli】ng to solve. Plastic \products clog our ocean/s, /thre】atening /marine /life and poll【uting the water. At current rates plastic】 is predicted to outweigh all the f\ish in t/h】e sea by the \year 2050. In Holla/nd, a new device 【is a sm\all si】gn of 】hope.】 \'WasteSha/【rk' is a remotely /contro\lled device that 】co【llects rubbish 】from the water.Th】is m/ini-catamaran has been developed to remo【ve plastics and ot/h【er fl】oating debris from\ 【the sur\face of l【akes a【nd oceans/. Its sensors c【an moni/【tor pol】luti【on】 le\【v【el/】s a【n】d】 other environmental ind/icators. It 】is e/lectrically powered, emissio/n-free a】nd can collect hundreds of \kilos o\f rubbish at a /time. Ric/hard Hardiman is the \founder of Ranmarine Technologies, the comp\any responsible fo【r Waste Shark:"What【 we're tryi】/ng to do is cre/\ate a small enough vesse】l that will g【et into tight spac\es where wa/ste c】ol】lects, particularly in the harbours and the port【s,\ and s【top all that waste being take/n out in】to the grea/】ter ocean."I have】 a visio】n in 【my head that /keeps me 】going, that is】 you'd be sit\ting in a/ control room from our\ site 】we could se\e where /eve【ry drone is across/ the p】lane【t, how many\ \are o【perating, how much wast/e is being ca】ught and actually see the real im【pac\t of that these things are\ making a\round the world."\T/his is one of the 】proje\cts that receive/d su】pport from th】】e European funds allocated to】 making plas【t】ic circular. R【anmari/ne 【/is a\ Dutch startup \company and has already g\ot 【cust/o】m/ers】 in several countries. Tessa Despinic is its design en\gineer:"The basi\c function of /t/he】 WasteShark is very simple.【 【It just swims aroun】d and collects tra/sh f/rom the su/rface. 【But inside, it's always chan】ging, we're always try/ing to make 【it light【er, more efficie】nt/, easier to do mainten/a\nce on. And we【're also buil】ding \an autonomous v/ersion that w/ill s】wim a】round accord【ing\ to/ w【】aypoints /that y\ou give】【 it. So we're alw【ays wo/rking o\n that 【and /making】 it better/."Th/e Eu/ropean Union is l】eading the global fight against marine lit】ter. Besides its/ policies curbing single\-us\e plas/】tic【s and r\ed\ucing waste from l/ost\ fishing gear/, the EU ha】s earmarked 】350/ million Euro \【for research a\n/d de】velopment in this area.Watch Good /M/orni【n】g E\urope's report i\n the player\ ab/ove.J\ournalist/ \na\me • Joao Vitor【 Da Silva MarquesVideo editor • Joa】o Vitor Da Silva Marques】/Sha】re this \art\icleCopy/pas\te t/he a\rt/icle\ vi】deo embed link below:CopyShareTwe\etSharesendS/hareTw】ee】tSha\resen】dMoreHide/S【har/eSendShareShar\eShareSen【dS/hareSh【areYou might also like \ 】 C【OP25: C\hile summit/ withdrawa\l /hits tourism \b】/【u【t \opens new door fo\r environment\ a\ctivists / 】 /\ \ 【 / Is Blac/k Friday bad for/ the environment? Activists take on\ 【sh/opping【 fr【enzy 】 】 / C【ol】dplay to /pause touring, cit【ing environmental reasons / More aboutclima【te】 chang\ecli【】】】mate protectio/nClimate emergen【cyClim/a\te crisisEnvironm\ent polluti/onEn/vironmental】【】 protectionHot TopicLearn more about 】 climate chang】e Hot 【TopicLearn more about climat【e change \ Browse today's tagsyT9t

f7G0Thi/s regenerative fabric no\】uri【shes soi】lbhCc

Red Sea corals flourish at previously-restricte【d Israeli beach

i9xNWe /spea】k 】to【 s/oci\al \anthropologist Mathilde Hojr【up】 Autzen abou/t how a Dani/s】h fishing c【ommu/nity】/ is now t【hriving a【fter ne【arly bei\n【g\ wiped out by f/ishing /quotas】.【Share this articleCo】py/paste the article video embed link below:Co\pyShareTw\eetSha【\resendShareT】w】eetS【haresendMoreHideSha【/reSendShar/eShareShareSendShare/ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 Depleted fish sto【cks can’t wait. The】 E】U and Norway need to commi【t t【o ending overfishi【ng now ǀ V/ie/w 】 【 】 【 \ Activist/s are rais【in\g funds to sav】e【 Danish wooden boats / / //More aboutF\i/sheryEnvironmen/tal【/【 protectionDenmar/k 】 \ / Most\ viewed 【 \ 】 // 】/ What influence on cl\ima\te 【】is the /c\orona/virus lockdown r/eally having? \ \【 The new AI system safeguard\ing premature babies from i】nfecti\o【n \ 【 【 】 Messenger RNA: the m】olecule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer / 】 \ Apple and Google say they'll wo/rk together to trace sp【read of coronavirus via sm【ar\tphones 【 【 】 】 How EU funding is 【chan】g】ing the f】【ac【e【 of Latvi】an i【nnovation\ 【 】 Browse today's t/agsLr0o

ZtIoHow Western wi/ll Sa】udi Arab【ia go t\o【 attr】act tourists?cNRQ

VJWuIn a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600Hi/ppos play a【【 key role in maintaining ecosys【】t【ems..\. wi/th their poop\ 【 fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tagsC5EH

dvifYou can find huge q/uanti【\ties of jelly/fish in European \seas,\ but in\ som\e areas the \number of blooms is【 problemat【ic】.T\h/e \Slo/venian coast on th/e Adriatic Se/a is among those regions\ affected by destructive invasio【ns.Re/search】】ers in the coun/try believe we 】could \somehow take advant/age of this pro\lifera/tion, es\p【ecia【lly in【/】 their poten】tial 【to clean【 up the oceans.Jell【yfish blooms a\re said t】o be a consequence of ove】rfi/sh\i【ng,\ and glo\】【bal war】ming/.Mar/ine chemis/t Katj/a Klun, who's fro】m the Slo/venia Nat\io【nal 】Instit【ute o】】f Bi】ology s/tudies l】ocal s】pecies】, such【 as barrel jellyfish and is i\/nterested in the mucus it secret【es."The r】elease/ of mucus is, of\ 【course, an indication of】 the stress. They want to protect\ th【】/emselves,"【 she says.In coop】eration wit/h Israeli 【res\earch\ers, 】the lab\oratory is de】\veloping a prototype 【of a filt【er for \treat】ment plants, u\sing jellyfish mucus.Their work is based on the a【b【\ility of the viscous l】i\/quid to trap mic【roplastic par】t【\icles.【】But /beyond this, she says "w【e \need to think about 【the sus/tainability of this te\chnology. So there is a need for more research, more pro/jects, and studying so not to be 】de\pendent】 on the 】s【easona【l【ity \of the jellyfish, how to【 cultivat】e/ i【t, and so on".A 】Europ】ean research projec/t cal/led GoJelly is aski【n】g\ whether we】 shoul】d f/i\sh jell】yfish, 】or grow them?"The wor】ld is s【earching fo/r new resources an】d \new mar/ine resources," says Amileh 【Javid【pour, a【 biologist and oceanologist and GoJe【ll【y project coordinato/r."That is 【【where the word blue growth is coming f/】ro\m. GoJelly shows the】 poss【i\bilities of usi【ng this biomass for】 a\ 【circular eco/nom\y"】.Another【 research focus is the possibility\ of\ producing agri【cultural fertilizer.Jellyfish contain r】are nutrients, such a\s phosphate, nitrogen and potass【ium th【at 【ar\e agricultural】 residues releas/e/】d at sea and a【bs】orbe\d by】 the an\ima\l.But scientists fa【ce many cha【lleng\】es, 【starting wit\h conservatio/n."If we \choose to t】reat them fresh, w\e/ can not keep jellyfish fo/r a lo\ng/ time. Therefore, we】 preserv\e them accord/ing to various d\rying proce//sses\," says Thorsten\/ Reinsch an agr】icultura/l scientis】t at\ \Cau K\iel."Other challe\nges are: How can I 【bring this 】drie】d mater\ial to /th/e plant? \Wh\at effect would this h/ave/ on soil micro-organism\s, but also on pl】ant gro/】wth, g/round/water and air quality?"Elsewh\ere an\/d【 Italian team is wor\kin/g on the/ pos\sibility of eating】 them.Their resea/rch is sti】ll underway, but the\y say that once their venom is removed, jelly\fi】sh can\ be【 d】】e】licious and good for your health."This is an extract of a \jellyf【ish that conta/i【ned mic/roalgae inside itse/lf. So in this product, there's/ both jell】yfis/h and microalgae. It h【as st/【rong【 【anti-oxidant properties/ a】nd we h】ave demonstra\ted t【hat it also has the ab\ility to inhibit the /growth of\ human cancer cells,"【 】says Antonella Leone, agricultural g】】enetics, ISPA-CNRBusiness o】ppor\tuni【ties or not, researchers stress【 the /need for an environmental\l\y】\ friend】ly model.1/2/1】【】212Additi】【onal sour【c\es •\ Video ed/itor: Myriam 】Co/pierShare this articleCopy/paste th\【e art/icle video embe】d link below:Cop】yShare/TweetShare】sendShareTweetSharesendM】ore/HideShareSe\ndShareShareS】hareSendShareShareYou might also like / 【\ Could seawe\ed be the fu】el /of】 /the \future? \ 【 / 】 / Why mo】re and more martime com【panies are mak】ing the mo】ve/ /towards E-ves/sel【s / \ 【 \ 】 The deep-rooted tr\uth \abou/t chicory root 】 \ More ab/outpl【asticC】ontam/inati】on\ of 】waterEnviron\me【ntal pro【tectionFauna and Flora【 \ M/ost viewed 】 / 】 What infl/uence on cl】i】mat【e is the 】c/oronav/irus/\ lockdown really having? / / / \The new AI system safeguarding/ premature 【babi//es f】rom in/fection \ / Messenger RN【A: the molecule that may teach our bodies 【to beat cancer/ / 【 / / \Apple a【nd G/oo】gle say the/y'll work 】together t】o tra\ce sp】read of coronavirus via smart【pho】nes /【 \ 【 How EU f】unding is changing the【 face of Latvian innovation /【 \ \ \】 【 Br【owse today's tags2KiA

u5ygIs f】ast/ fashion slowing down?NPuN

jcclIt 】is one of the most popula/r destinations for /tourists and one of the most famous islands in the world but its 70,Italian ban o\n】 p\lastic cotton 【buds comes\ 【/into effect0 inhabit\ants l】ive under the real threat of a pos/sible earthquake or a vol】canic eruption &md【ash; with【 no \evacuation plan【 set up.Ischia 】is on\【e of the pearls of the N\e【apolitan archipelag】o.\ Lar\ger th】【an Capri】 a/n\d Pr】ocida, 】its tourism has d【eveloped thanks to its morphological peculiarities and its volc\anic o/rigin【s. Even\ i】n winte\【r, the /elderly【 savour thermal treatments while younger and 】adventurous visitors take delight in climbing Mount Epome\o — Is【chia's peak that/ rises on /the【 slopes of 】an a【ctive s\ubmarin\e volcano whose last eruptio【【n da】\tes back to 1302.Walking aroun【d the si【x towns scattered a【roun【d the /islan/d, it \is impossible 【\not t/o no\tice// the sma\ll clouds of white smoke rising from t/he/ ground, emanating fro【m fumaroles o/r cracks in the earth th】at emi【【\ts off st】eam】 a\nd gas."Ischia is a volcanic island/, /the po】rt itself is o/n an ancient crater" explains Francesca Bianco】, director of the Nap】les Sectio【n of 【t】】he National Institute of Geophysics \and Volcano【logy's】 Vesuvius 【Observatory. The INGV【 moni【/tors vari\a】tio】ns in the param/eters \of control in the Neapolit】an volcanic distric\t, /an area that includes V/esuvius, Ischia and the Phlegraean 】Fields."At the m【oment \we are not 【recording an active volcanic dy【namic for \Ischia —\ I mea】n 【that the volcano is activ】e \but there are /no ano【malies. Instead,/ we are wit\ne\ssing a phase of lifting \an\d we\ have raised the alert l【evel【 for the Campi Flegrei," she\ added.'We live on fire'The underwater vol【can】o /is t】herefore 【no\t the imme\diate concern of researchers but I】sch【ia mu/st still face the threats of seismic mov】ements indirectly linked /【to its presence.I【n August 2017, the island was【 hit /b】y /【an /earthquake t【h【【at killed two people, injured more than 40 others, and destroyed man【y hous】es."We cannot】 predict earthquakes but \w】e know the seismi【c his】to/ry【 of the i\sland," Bianco continued. "The 2017 event i】s not\ linked to m【agm\/a【tic phenomena but we kno/w that, due】 to the presenc\e of the volcano, a】/nd its w/eigh\t, the isl】and is low\e/r【ing causing fr/act\ures. It is obviou/s that v】olcanic dynamics increase the seismic risk 】of【 Isc/】hia."The earthquake al/so highlighted just how difficult it can be to ma\na/ge an emerg\ency on the island. That ni\ght ab】out 20,000 people 【&mda/sh; l/ocals a【nd tourist【s &mdas\h; came to the\ port 【to be ev】a】cuat【ed but there we【re not enough ferries.Neverthe【less, th\e Ischitans do no【t seem to \worry t【oo m\uc\h a】【nd\ f】ace the/ risk 】with a t/ouch of typic\ally Ne【apol】ita\】n fatalism."We literally l/i/ve on f】ire, we p【ut ourselves in the hands of the Eternal Father, what/ 【else shoul【d we do?" an elderly gentleman, wh】o /sells cheeses and mozzarella on the roadside/, s/aid."You see,【 we 】are surrounded by the 【sea, 【where shoul】d we go? If there is an】】 eruption we die on t\he island or at sea, it\ is impo】ssib】le to 】leave he\re qui\ck/ly," a【nother inha【bitant said.'No integrated plan/'Fabio Matter\a, from the local Ci/vil \Pr\ote【ction, told Euro【news \that "there is no i\ntegrated plan【 on the is//land】 fo/r erup\t/ions and【 earthquak\es," despite【 the fact /that "th/e 2017 /】shoc/k ca【u\ght】 us comp\letely un【prep\are/d【.\""There is no in】/tegrated plan of the islan】d for】 eruptio】ns and earthquakes. 【The shock of 201】7 has caught us 】completely unprepared," explains 【Fabio Mat\ter【a of t】he local Civ】il Protection, while 】he\ sh【】ow\s me the small opera/ting r\oo【m 】o/bta【ined in an a/ncient therma/l centre used for ot【her functions/."Th/e Campania】 region has recently【 issued a tender for the municipalities to finance 】evacuation plans. Now 】every singl\/【e【 muni/】c【ipality should work out its /own plan,"\ he】 sa\】id, labelling it "nonsense""If t】he/re is 【a disaster i】t will involve the 【whole island and/ the/ strategy 【shou【ld be common," he concluded.Fran\cesco Emilio Borreli】, regional councillor for the/ Green party has 【been critica\l of the lack o】】f pre\paredness for years."】The 【three a\reas obs【erv】ed by【 the /INGV 】a】r\e【 very urbanised,"\ h】e flagged. "Vesuvius inv/olv【es】 700,000 people, there i】s\ an evacuation plan but the exercis】es】 are no】 longer carried【【 \out.】""In Pozzu/ol】】i (Campi Fle/gr/ei) they have created an ev】acuation plan and h\a/ve begun to 】do/ some test【s but we ar【e v】ery f【ar from the possib【ility of actuall\y saving 500,000 people. In/ Ischia/ there app】e/ars to be 】little interest from anyon【e,/ perhaps t/hey think\ tha\t\ it is impos/sible to save i/ts【】 inhabitants,/" /he went 】on.Men \vs naturePhe【nomena such as 【/ear/thquakes and volc/a【/nic eru/p】tions are often 【\unpredictable and dep\e】/nd on nature but some \of the serious consequenc\e】\s of the earth/quake \of 2017 can be attributed exclusiv\ely to human action.T【he volc/an【i\c areas/ of the Neapo【lit】an territory have face】d w/\ild urbanisatio】n over th/e years with administra/tio\ns that rarely managed to opp\ose buildi/ng sp\eculation.Vesuvius, Campi F/leg\r】ei and 】Ischi\a are home to over 1%】 of the Ital/ian\ popula【tion, exposed\ 】【to pos\sibl】e cat/astrophic ev\e/nts \without the p\ossibility of ra【pid eva】cuation.A well-known risk that did no/t prevent the pop】\ula】ti【on of Is/chia from 【growing ex/ponentially from 23,511 inhabita【nts in\ /1861 /t/o 34,201 in 196/1, and 64,031 in 2016.Over the /l】ast 】50 years】, urbanised areas on/ the】】 island ha】ve g/rown from 9% of the 【/whole/ territory \to 30%, a figure thr【ee times highe\r \than the nation【al average,\ accordi【ng t/o researc/h【ers from the U【niversity of L'Aqui\la.\/【 Ev【en \tourism【, after a brief decline following the e\arthquake, is g【rowin/【g ag【ain, with over 3 mill】ion ann\u/al visitor】s."There【 are\ d\oze\ns of magnit【ud\e 4 earthquakes i】n Italy. The one in Ischia o】f 2017 is the onl/y one /I ca\n \remember havi【ng caused s】im【ilar damages\ \",【 Bianco explained. "The damag【e of this pheno【menon, in th】is\ 【case/, is to be attributed 】more to \h/o/w men\【 have decided to/ build than 【to nature,"【 she con【cluded.'Single\ muni】cipality'For\ Bo/relli, the situation is】 【"rea/lly deadly"."We have a simila】r situation to】 Japan, we are talking about 【the are】a】 with the/ highest number of volcanoe/s in 】Italy and at the same time\ the mos】/t\ densely populated and highly 【urbanised, with th\e gr】eatest\ anthro【pic pressure and the highest /rate】 】of illegal activity," he stressed."The absen】ce of an evacu//a【tion pl\an for Ischia】 is explained by an irresponsibl/e policy. N【【ature is cyc\lic/\al, we\ know that we will f【ace other】 earthquakes, perhaps \an e/ruption, it may be/ in a ce\ntury, in a millennium. W\e should have a pol】i/cy that loo/ks to t\omorrow but it would be necessary 】】to pu【t admini【strations and citize】ns in f/ront of t/he fact that some areas must be co\mpletely evacuate【【d," he continued.【A fisherman told【 Euronew】s on the s\hore of t/he p】o\rt tha】t a/ single【 admin/is/tration should be c/reated to come u【p wi/th a single evac】】uatio/n 【plan /】for t】he whole island a/nd t\h】at the mayors o\f/ th【e six municipalities should, th】erefore, wo\rk together."I think that i\f they do\n't do it, n【ature will/ do what we can【't do: Epomeo will explod】e, ma/ke six lavas【 of fire and fi\nally】 make a single municipality," he said【.Share 】t\his articleS【hare\T/weet\Sha】re/send】Sha\re/Tweet\SharesendMoreHideShareSend/ShareSha【reShare/\SendS【har】eShareYou migh】【t also li】ke 】 \ 【 】 /Ita】lian【 brid/】ge【 colla】ps\es injuring only/ 】one\ as lockdown condit\ions red//uce traff】【ic 】 】 【 Ita/lian d【o/ctor treats/ corona】virus patients【】 at h【o/me 【 】 【 / / 【 【 】/ Baskets of【/ s\oli\da/r【ity lowered/ from Na\ples balconie\s amid】 coro/na\viru/s chaos 】 】】 \Mo【r【】【e aboutVolcano eruptionItalyEnvironmental prote\ctionEm/er//gency / 【Brow【se to】day s\ tagsQTcM

CYho“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Text si】zeAaAa\The top supermarket chain in Malaysia 】is\ prohi/biting the sale of anti-\palm 】produc】/ts, in an attempt to preserve its c\ontroversial key commo/dity.Mala/y】sia’s largest sup\ermarket, M【ydin, has today announ\ce】d a ban o【n 】any item that 【is labelled【 ‘p【alm】-oil-free&rsqu/o; a\s i/t believes this dam/ages the reputation /of palm oil produ/ction.\】 【The s\outh-e\ast Asian country is the secon【d largest】 pr\oducer of the oil】, after In】donesia. Th【e two 【neighbouri】ng nations produce a【【rou】nd 85% /of 【the world&rs】quo【【;s palm to【【【g】e/t/her, contrib【uting to a billion industry aroun】d the g\l/ob【e.\The supermarket's decision\ follows a 】lobbying offensive launched by】 the Malaysian government in 2018 to defen\d the p【alm oil】 \industry from becoming \obs/olete. \Af\ter【 a】 Washingt\on c\onsultancy present】ed a \paper likenin【g palm o】i\l to \tobacco, Ma【laysia stepped up its protectionist measures to en【sure the oil/ /【/does\ not become a “【pariah】 product”.Land that has been \clearedat an oil\ pal/m plantati】on in Johor, Mal】aysiaReu【tersDeclining to 】specify the amount o【f anti-pa\lm pr【oduct【s【 sold at his【 chain, Ameer Ali My【din, m【an】agi【ng\ direct】or of Mydin Mohame】d Holdings】 Bhd told reporters【 “we \must suppo】rt palm oil【/”. &ldquo/;By labelling something that there is no palm oil, you&r\sq/uo;re actually 】telling p/eople t\hat palm oil is bad for you”, h\e said, emphasising /the\ /impo\rtance of the ind【ust/ry to 【the\ Malaysian econo【my.Rela【ted |/ Estée Lau【der launches su\stain\able scheme to t】ackle 】palm oil productionTeresa Kok, Malaysia/&rsqu【o【;s minister o】f 【pr/i/m】ar【y indus/trie】s, agreed with the s\upermarket’s decision【 and encouraged othe/\r cha【ins 】in 【Malaysia to do the same/.Mydin's I\】nstagram account shared\ thi【】s video toda】y, promotin\g 'Kar】nival Saya\ngi Sawi】tku'\, tr】anslated【 as 'My Dear Palm Carnival' la【unched 】by\ minist】\er 【Tere\sa Kok hersel/f. Vie】w【 this post on In/stagramMenteri 【Ind】ustri U\tama, YB Puan Teresa \Kok mela\nca】rk】an K/【arnival 】Sayangi \Saw\itku di Pasar Raya MYDIN\ USJ\, Suban【g Jaya. Karnival Sayangi Sawitku adalah anjuran Ma/jlis Minyak Sawit Malaysia (MPOC), denga】n】 kerjasama MYDIN.. Karnival be【rmula da【r\i 5【 /】Sept hin\gga 【8// /Sep\t 2019. Jom】 ramai 】ram\ai memeriahkan/ lagi karnival ini‼️ . #mydinmalays\ia #mpoc】 #sayangi【【sawi】tkuA post shared by MYDI/N Malaysia \(@/mydi//nmalaysia) on Se】p 5】, /2019 at 2:/53a/m PDTIn response t【o the】 】n】ew/s, the Environme\ntal Jus\tice Founda/tion (EJF) spo\ke to Euronews Li】ving. "Banning \pa/lm-oil \free pr\】oducts is】 a re/t\r/ogra【de 】and p/oorly thought-out move that 【will co\st Mydin", said S/teve Trent, EJF's【 Executive\ Director. He went/ 】on to】 【say/ that /palm oil production causes "unwa】rran【ted】 and untena】ble destru【c【tion 【】of t】he rainforest" end【angering s】pe\cies. In Trent's own words, the expansion 【of pal【m oil estates "must /end now."Offering some adv\ice to the Ma/laysian chain of supermarkets, Trent conclude/d\:"Rat\her than refusing to sell palm-oil-f【ree products, Mydin should put a】l【l t】heir \effo【rt in to e/nsuring that any pa/lm oil they do\ s\ell i【s &】nd【ash; verifiably \– sustainable, legal】 and ethical. It must not lead to【 any more def\or【estatio\n. 】We need to see /t\ransparency and\ independent inspect/ions across the se\ctor\, from seed 【t【o supermar】\ket shelf."In\te\rnational/ appro】ach 】】to pal】m oil produ\ct【ionPalm oil is a vast industr/y, prese【nt in half 】】of a【【l\l s\u\permark】et products fro】m cosmetics and make up to froz\e/n pizzas, biscuits and margarine. It is the target of swathes of envi\ronmental act\ivi【sm due to deforestation, wh\ich destroy【s 【the natu【ral habit【at of 【man【y species like orangutans.Steps have been taken on an intern/ational level to boy/cott t】he industry. Earlier this y】ear】, the Eur/opean Union passe/d /a law to phase out pal【【m oil from renewable fue/l by 2030 and over 【250 organisati/ons con/d\emned the【 ‘g\re/enwas/hing’ of palm】 oil /as sustainable】,】 according to Rainforest Re\scue.In August,【 Mal】aysian\ Pr【ime Minis】ter Mahathir Moh/amad fou】g/ht back, claiming that the accusation pal\m oil was 】linked to defor\estation】 w】a【s\ “baseless, un】fair a【n/【】d unjustified.” H\e claims th\at【 the【 /industry is act】in\g “responsibly【&rdquo\; and shou【ld not be attac【ked【,// as it 】is contributing grea】tly to the so【cio-economic wel】l-b】e/ing of the Malaysian /people.S】/h】are this a】rticle \ / More from life 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tags4LW8

geD9An international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gsOLkj

r9peFamily-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net widery9S8

CUJ3How Western wi/ll Sa】udi Arab【ia go t\o【 attr】act tourists?NLq0

KxFpEasy【Jet unveils plans to become world&】#0//9;s first carb/on-】neutr】al airlinejBNq

F0P4\Is o\ne week en\ough?【 0 m【edia outle\【ts【 dedicate \】news to climate 】changemaD3

9T8Y】One of Europe&r\squ【o;s biggest music festivals ha/s take\n its eco-c/reden/tials to the ne】xt l\】evel this summer, with r\eusable pape】r t\e/nts, reu\sable /c\u【ps a\nd e】ven water-saving toilet\s.Sziget festival /on Haj\】ógy&a/a\cute;ri】 Is【land, B【udape\/st, Hungary, kicked off on Wednesday, with【 a raft 】o\f en/vir/onmen\tally-friend\ly impr/ovements, and a focus on the climate.\As we\ll as all the music and partying, the UN Messenger of Peac\e Dr 】Jane Goodall w【il【l be just 】one of the\ speakers promot/ing the imp【ortance o/f pr\otecting the \env\i\ronment at/\ the ne\a】rly week-long fes/tival.&l【dqu\o/;Last】 year we could replace one and a/ half million single-use glasse【s wit/【h a few hundred /】th\ousand of re【u【sable glasses,” said Ákos Dominus, 】project manager of the Green Is【land【 project.“This yea\r\, the Sziget festi/val will 】consume million plastic glasses less, and the number is rising/ ev】ery【 year. So we can see how】 sustain】able this \program is.&r】dquo;On 】Sziget’s l【ast day/, tents, sleepi】ng bags, and mats\ that have been left】 behind will 】be co【llected by cha【rity organizati\ons.Share this a【/rticleC/opy/paste the article vid/【eo embed lin/k be【low:Cop/yShareTweetShar/esendSha【reTweetS】haresendMore/HideShareSen】dShareSha\/reShareSendS\hareShareYou【【 might al】so l】ike 】 S【\zi\get fest】iv/al atte】ndee/s defend Coca C】o/la's #LoveIsLove campaign in Hu/ngary / 【 【 / Hunga】rian/s say 【goodb/ye /】to winter with bizarre and scary c\ostume festiv】a【l 【 【 \ Ras Al/ Khaimah \Fine Arts Festi\val spo】tlights Emira\t\i &/; int/ernational \talent 】 / More】 ab\outSziget【 festi】val】FestivalEnvi/ronmental prot/ection / B【ro】wse today�/39;】s tags206f

uq9iTex/t sizeAaAaOn【e in four workers】 would take a pay cut to /do/ w】ork that&rsquo\;s bett】er \fo】r the envir/onment, a】ccor/din】g to new【 re【search 【by【/ careers sit【e Totaljobs. That figu/re rises t【o half among millennials, aged\ 23-38.】Al\so known as Generation Z, mi【llennials told res】earchers they’】d be wi【lling t【o /drop &pou\nd;11,0 from their 【salaries o】n average【. That compare\s to £3,800 \Genera【tion X respond】ents【 aged b】etween 39-54 said they’d be willing/ to forgo for a g/reener j】ob role.In the UK, the\ surv【ey found 60% of j【obs】eekers resear\ched a potent/ial\ employe】r’/s sustainabilit\y and 】environme】nt cr\edentia/ls before/ accepting a positio】n. M\eanwhile, \f\our in every five empl【oyees【\ though\t comp\anies had/ a re【spons【ibility to lo\o/k after /the【 environment,【 with thre【e\ in【 f】ive agreeing their employers should be /【do】ing more.Read more | Noughti\e/s\ rap legend Akon to build gre/en cityA\roun/d th/e same amou/nt were\ willing to accept cuts in sp】【ending on activitie\s like team lunche\s, furniture an【d events.Environment\ attitudes inspi/red by David Att】enb/orough an\d Greta ThunbergSome 18% of wo【rkers/ in g\en/eral an/d 34% mi/llennial【s reported\ that they \would refu/se t【o work for a company 】they thought wa\s har】ming the natural world. The majority said they w】ere m/ore interest【ed in cl\imate issues】\【 than t】\hey wer\e five years ag\o, sayi【n/g a hig/her profi【le【 in the\ /media ha\d drawn【 their attenti【on.Greta Th\unberg】 arrives \in Spain for】 COP 25Copyrigh\t 2019 \The Associated Press.】 All r/ights reservedPedr【o RochaT\he influen【ce of n/at\ural】ist a\nd broadcaster Sir【 David Attenb【orough and young ac【tiv】ist G【reta Th/unberg were 】also cited as key drive/rs for pe】opl【e to\ cut their carbon footprint.“It has ne\ver bee【n more \i/mportant f/\or busi【nesses to be 【par\t of th】e solution to 【our pl】anetary /c【rises,” said Gudrun \C/artwright, envi【ronment d\irector 】at Bus】iness i【n the Community.【&ldquo/;Young people are no 】long】er begging leaders 】to 】change but tell】ing them /that cha/nge is comi\ng re\gardles【s. Businesses that i】gno】re\ it /face an imminent\ exis\te】ntial threat. Our futures depend on \rapid,【 】ambit/ious action, and we can all make a differen【ce.”Sh【are this article More from li\febP9M

1.nobxTourism set to bl\oom in Angola’s desert regionPOD5

2.p3Z1At the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tags3DUd

3.63cZAl\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tagsT8fn

4.OEwQ\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ife4VDH

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l4lF】One of Europe&r\squ【o;s biggest music festivals ha/s take\n its eco-c/reden/tials to the ne】xt l\】evel this summer, with r\eusable pape】r t\e/nts, reu\sable /c\u【ps a\nd e】ven water-saving toilet\s.Sziget festival /on Haj\】ógy&a/a\cute;ri】 Is【land, B【udape\/st, Hungary, kicked off on Wednesday, with【 a raft 】o\f en/vir/onmen\tally-friend\ly impr/ovements, and a focus on the climate.\As we\ll as all the music and partying, the UN Messenger of Peac\e Dr 】Jane Goodall w【il【l be just 】one of the\ speakers promot/ing the imp【ortance o/f pr\otecting the \env\i\ronment at/\ the ne\a】rly week-long fes/tival.&l【dqu\o/;Last】 year we could replace one and a/ half million single-use glasse【s wit/【h a few hundred /】th\ousand of re【u【sable glasses,” said Ákos Dominus, 】project manager of the Green Is【land【 project.“This yea\r\, the Sziget festi/val will 】consume million plastic glasses less, and the number is rising/ ev】ery【 year. So we can see how】 sustain】able this \program is.&r】dquo;On 】Sziget’s l【ast day/, tents, sleepi】ng bags, and mats\ that have been left】 behind will 】be co【llected by cha【rity organizati\ons.Share this a【/rticleC/opy/paste the article vid/【eo embed lin/k be【low:Cop/yShareTweetShar/esendSha【reTweetS】haresendMore/HideShareSen】dShareSha\/reShareSendS\hareShareYou【【 might al】so l】ike 】 S【\zi\get fest】iv/al atte】ndee/s defend Coca C】o/la's #LoveIsLove campaign in Hu/ngary / 【 【 / Hunga】rian/s say 【goodb/ye /】to winter with bizarre and scary c\ostume festiv】a【l 【 【 \ Ras Al/ Khaimah \Fine Arts Festi\val spo】tlights Emira\t\i &/; int/ernational \talent 】 / More】 ab\outSziget【 festi】val】FestivalEnvi/ronmental prot/ection / B【ro】wse today�/39;】s tagshgID

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YC8iHow the EU stamped dow\n on de/c\ades of【 illeg\al【 fishing \in T\hai\landrChL

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F5OYFor many ages, D】anish fishermen have been u\si】ng cl/】inker-built oaken boats, ligh/\】twei/ght and\ flex/ibl】e enough to land directly on 】sand beaches. Thi【s t\raditi】ona】\l 【/wa】y of coastal fishing is considered【 】】more friendly to the marine environment than large-scale \【industri【al me\thods.【But can the boat-b/uilding craft survive the curren【t decli】ne 【of Danis/h\ fishing vi/llages? Fish/ermen and other activists fro】m the Jammerbugt mun【icip\ality of Denmark are \hopi【ng t\o preserve the tradit【ion for at least \anothe\r 100/ years by b\ui\lding 10 new N\ordic 【sea boats for the \young gener/ation of small-scale coastal fishers. Their asso/ciation【, &ldq/uo;Ocean/【 in Balance”, has laun\ched a public cam【paig】n aiming to raise 7/,150,000\ euro【s for th】e boats.【I【n this 360-degree video, Thomas H【øjr【up, the chairman of/ &ldqu\o;Ocean in Balance”, sh\ows us around \a clink】er-built bo\at curren】tly u】n/der cons【truction, exp】laining \the un\ique way the\se boats are de/signed 】and b/ui【lt.【】Journalist name/ • Denis Loc】tierV【i】deo e】d【\it】【or • De\nis 】】LoctierShare this artic/leShare】TweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideSha\reSendSha/reShareShareSendShareSha/reYou\ might al】/so l】ike 】 【 】 \Dan【i/sh fisheries t【ak】】e back 】contro\l 【 】 【 / \ \ 】 How small scal【e fisheries saved Da【nish】 fishi/ng communi【ti【e】s 】 】【 【 \ What’s killing our unde\r】water ecosystems? 【 More abo\ut360° videoFisheryD\e/nmarkEnviron\m\ental protection \ Most 【viewed 】【 】 \ 【 】 】 What 【i//nfluence on climate is the coronav】irus lockdown re】ally having? \ 【 \ / 】 T\he new \AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from】 infection \ / 【【 \Messenger RNA: th【e molecule t\ha】t may 】teach our bodies to b【eat cancer /【】 /【 】 \ \ Apple and Google/ say they【9;ll wo【rk toge】ther to 】trace spread of coron/avirus via smart【phones \ How EU funding i\s c/hanging th\e face/ o【f Latvian\ inn】ov】ation 】 \ Br】owse today�s tag/sn4h9

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zr15Text sizeA/a】AaIt tur【n\s out, the Duke of S【us\sex/ is/ an amazin\g phot\ogr】ap\her. And he ch\ose Eart/h D/ay to】 give a proof of that, as【 h【e posted 8 of his s/tunning 【images about natu/re on Inst【agram, in ord【/er to sh【are his environm/ental 【point of view. "Today is #earthday - 【an】 opportun】ity to learn ab/out, celebrate】 【and continue】 to safegua\rd our planet/, our 】home【," the caption reads. Fro】m critically【\ 【en\dang】e/red /species to【】 \plas/tic】 pollution,\ /the selection provide【s\ an ove【rview of today's most pressing en】v/ironme【ntal issu【es./Prince】 Harry's comm\itmen/t to protecting/ \the env\ironment is alrea】dy widely known. The Duke and Duchess of Sus/s\ex even used their own wedding day as an action ag\ai\n/st ocean pollution by as】king wel\l-wis【hers to support cer\t/ain\ cha【rities instead of offering gifts. In the me【antime, Meghan, Duchess of S【ussex ha/s already【\ /been recogniz【ed f/or her 【ethical fashion choices. The /ro】yal household is also com/mitte【d t【o reducing its en\vironmental impact\, amon\g othe\r measures, the Buckingham Palace has anno】unced 】some change/s last\ year】, such as cu\tti】ng back on【 the use of plast\ics, in ord\er】 to figh】t agai/【nst 】plasti】c pollution.Click on the【 video above to/ see the /ph【oto\s ta/ken by Prin】ce Harry.S\hare this article \ More from【 lifeYCJK

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zu3jGood c/hemis/【try: helping busine】/ss to come w】ithin REACH rulessikS

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LHDRWi\th/ the Europ\ean Union’s】 focus on the climate action and the EU\ G【reen D\eal, Commissioner \for Envir【on】ment, Oceans【 and F【is/h/e【ries \Virginijus Sinke/vič/;ius is la【unching a /new/ 【Global Coalition for Bi【odiversit【y\ at Wor【ld Wild Life Day in】\【 Monaco.The youngest Com】missio】ner at the Eu\ropean Union, Lith】uanian S【inkevi&【#2/69;ius was a member of \Lithuania【n【 Parliament and Minister of the /Ec【/onomy and In\】no【va/tion o【f the Republic of Lithuania be【fo】re t【aking the p】ost a】t t】he E【uro】pean Commission.【Now charged with finding European solu\tions to the worsening /c】limate and ecological crisis, he spoke to Euronews' busine】ss edito【r,\ Sas】ha Vakulina about what is re】qu\ired to turn climate change and bio【d】【】ivers【ity\ loss around.Tell us【【\ a b【it more a】bout th【e Global Coalition for /Biodiversity and 】what is its role\ wh【en/ it comes to the bigger E\U e/n/】vironment】】al agenda?\I think we hav】e a\chieved\ terrific succes\s 【in rec【【e【nt years launching/ similar campai/gns on marin\e litte\r, on plast\【ic pollution in our oceans. Now ha】vin】g【 \thi/s year/ 】being devote【d to biodiversity, it is time to\ raise awareness about /biodiversity loss. The science is very 】】clear:/ 【out of 8 million as/】sesse\d – /1 mi\llion are at risk of extinction. We ha\ve to halt biod/】iversity loss caused /by 【the human activ】ities. \The b】e【st tool to /do so is a societ/y which is mobilized, which supp【orts certai【n decisions, which leads us to me\et/ing ho【pefully in Oc/tober/ in China【 /to 【r】each a global 【agr//e/ement equal t】o t\he P】aris \Accord reached in 201】6.And latest Euro-bar】ometer 【shows us 94% o【f Europeans care about environment【 /\p【r/otectio】n\ – 【it is a clear signal for politicians to【 act. A】nd I am tru【l\y p/roud that the】 European Commissio\n did so from t\he very \first days, introducing our flagship initiative &ndash\】; the Eur】opean Gr/een Deal.With the bi/g social movement over the past year, i/ncluding Frida\ys fo】r Fu】\tur【e, there has been a big focus on/ the climate /and /ecological crisis. Should【 focu/s shift to/wards【 biodi\/vers【【ity?【To\ b\e honest we don\&rsq【uo;t need \to c】\h\ange t\he】 focus. Climate change is \important and significa】nt 【to be a/ware of. And I a【m 【truly happ【y th】at we\ finally reached the】 point that w//hen you ask people in t/he \st/reet, they w\ill explai】n climate change to you. I think we have to do the same great work raising awareness about \biod】iver/s\ity. Because\ if y】ou lo/ok at the solution for stopping climate change/ and/ glob/al warming, on/\e third/ of it i/s in having a healthy ecosystem of biodiv【/ersity【 &n】d\ash; healt/【hy 【oceans\, seas, la】nd】】【, forest - everythin/g around\ us is/ biodiversity】】. 】And, of course, th】ose 】specie\s whi【c【h not o【nly 【keep o【ur nature alive, but also put food on our】 table【】s.The Eu】ropean Union has clearly put 【the Green D】e】al on】\ top on its age\nda. What is the 'blue' element \of the bigger Green\ 】Deal Pict】ur/e?That is 】correct. P【art of my\ work is to make the Green deal blue. By【 protectin】g biodiversit【y we canno【t speak only about protecting sp\ecies or\ protectio/\n of l/and, soil or fores】t. We【 also have to address oceans. That is \why this year it is/ going t】o 【be c【rucially important /】\to als】o reach a global agreement on \/protection of the high seas】,\ which today, \is not being ful/ly implemented.EU budget talks o【r M\ult】ia\nnual /Fin/a//ncial Framework (MFF) \talks are on/ /amid pr】essu【re for more climate action. What are 】your expectations a/nd what 】are your priori\ties th\】a【t/ y\ou want to see fr】om the MFF?】F【irst o\f all, pro【bably, the Commissi【on would like to see agreement. We /can/no【t a//fford delay and that would be, pro】bably, /th\e worst outcome.S】econdly,】 】o】f course, if /we \are to seriou\sly step \u\p effort on biodive】rsity protectio】n, on t/he Green Deal, it has【 to be su】fficien】tly funded. I a】m glad to see that that call\ has 【been heard【, bu\t most imp】ortant】】 is th\e part on subsidies. S【ubsi【【die】s, payme/nts\, which \go directl【y from/ the EU budget, fro\m different en/velope/s – they 】also have to /be in\】 line 】with the 】Gree/n Deal and the/y can】not enhance】 biodiversity loss or stimulate climate change.W\e have \to be sure that/ certain activ/i\ties do/\n’t cause environmenta\l loss, because it \would be ve\/ry strange if on the\ one han/d we increase【 】funding for b】iodiversity pro/t】ection, but on the other hand we fund certa【in \a】ctivities /that cause biodiversity lo【ss【.Y【ou’/ve touc\hed upon challenges and the i/mporta】【nt thi】n【\gs t/o do this year, what a【bout th\e Brexit s】】itu\ation when i】t comes to fisheries/【?Ne】go【tiations \just started and w\e are ready to t】alk. And I think if we are going to】 have a d\ialog【 where we/ are ready to mee/t each other, we a【re\ going 】to h】ave\ /a result tha】t is satisfying to all. The most imp【or【tant rea/lly 】i【s to com/e】 with \willingne\ss to find an /agreement.The /Fisheries agreement is th【e only one th【at's time bo\und, /it is a 【very short time. Let/’/s begin.\【 We a\re ready,\ I know the B\ritish /side as well. We 】will work tirelessly to find the best agreement/.【As a\【 former Mi/nister for the Economy and\ 【Innovation \in Lithuania, how does t/his 】experien/ce influence your job now as EU Co/mmissioner for Environment, Oceans and /Fisheries?On】e of t\he\ key \initia/tives tha/t we a\re g】oi/ng 【to a】/nnounce on the 11 March is t\he 】Cir【cular\ 【Economy A】\c\ti\on pl\an. It has various elements fro】m product policy to business 】and small/】 and medium enter】prise/ (SME) in【volvement. Beca/use if we are successful 【in imple\menting a \c/ircular econ\omy and 】changing\ current economic activities, if we to manage decoup\le grow【th from extract】i/on of resources, we can be very s【ucces\sful at halting biodivers】it】y loss. Bec【ause biodiversity loss is mainly【 due to extractio\n of resources which put enor/mous pr\essure on o】ur envi【】r【onment.T】h/ere is this aspect of transitio/【n 】a【s well when it comes 【to these\ new】 polic/ie【s. 【What is your\ take/ on that\?It i\s v/】ery \im\portant and \from the very b【eginning the【 Commi/ssion was vocal t\hat n\obod/y can be left \behin/【d.】 It i\s imp【ort】ant to mention that G】r】ee】n 【Deal i【s a g】rowth st】rategy 【and 】growth m\eans not t【o hold the amb】ition, but also help those, who are still not the】re. \An】d I think】 】the Green Deal can only be successful by/ having eve/ryone on board.An\d the final question, /you are the youngest commis【【sioner. How/ does th】】at influence your \polici\es?I a【m【 very open to communicate with everyone, wi\】th 】every Europ\ean citiz【en】 w/ho cares. 【And I think my role is to \/【raise awar/eness and 】to d\eliver./Share this articleCopy/】p】aste the article video embed link below/:Copy】ShareTwe】etSharesendShareTweet\/SharesendM\/ore\】HideShar【eSendSh【areShareShareSendShareShar】eYou 【【might also like 】 \ "No single co\untry w】ill be left behind in t】his crisi【】s&q\uot; says【 EU Commissioner for Internal Market / 【 【 / / \【 】 Fiscal support to non-Eurozone countr】ies a p】ossibil\ity as 】bloc backs\ ma【ssive coronavir【us 】rescue plan 】 【 / \ \ \【 Cor/on【avirus: an unpr】ecede/nted c】hallenge to de\mocracy? / 【 More aboutEnvi】ronmental prot】ec】tionE【U Com\missionE\uropean 】politicsMon\aco 【 Browse today's tagsnYxe

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