星力手机电玩游戏

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AG永久入口💰【ag88.shop】💰星力手机电玩游戏It 】is one of the most popula/r destinations for /tourists and one of the most famous islands in the world but its 70,Our s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】ags0 inhabit\ants l】ive under the real threat of a pos/sible earthquake or a vol】canic eruption &md【ash; with【 no \evacuation plan【 set up.Ischia 】is on\【e of the pearls of the N\e【apolitan archipelag】o.\ Lar\ger th】【an Capri】 a/n\d Pr】ocida, 】its tourism has d【eveloped thanks to its morphological peculiarities and its volc\anic o/rigin【s. Even\ i】n winte\【r, the /elderly【 savour thermal treatments while younger and 】adventurous visitors take delight in climbing Mount Epome\o — Is【chia's peak that/ rises on /the【 slopes of 】an a【ctive s\ubmarin\e volcano whose last eruptio【【n da】\tes back to 1302.Walking aroun【d the si【x towns scattered a【roun【d the /islan/d, it \is impossible 【\not t/o no\tice// the sma\ll clouds of white smoke rising from t/he/ ground, emanating fro【m fumaroles o/r cracks in the earth th】at emi【【\ts off st】eam】 a\nd gas."Ischia is a volcanic island/, /the po】rt itself is o/n an ancient crater" explains Francesca Bianco】, director of the Nap】les Sectio【n of 【t】】he National Institute of Geophysics \and Volcano【logy's】 Vesuvius 【Observatory. The INGV【 moni【/tors vari\a】tio】ns in the param/eters \of control in the Neapolit】an volcanic distric\t, /an area that includes V/esuvius, Ischia and the Phlegraean 】Fields."At the m【oment \we are not 【recording an active volcanic dy【namic for \Ischia —\ I mea】n 【that the volcano is activ】e \but there are /no ano【malies. Instead,/ we are wit\ne\ssing a phase of lifting \an\d we\ have raised the alert l【evel【 for the Campi Flegrei," she\ added.'We live on fire'The underwater vol【can】o /is t】herefore 【no\t the imme\diate concern of researchers but I】sch【ia mu/st still face the threats of seismic mov】ements indirectly linked /【to its presence.I【n August 2017, the island was【 hit /b】y /【an /earthquake t【h【【at killed two people, injured more than 40 others, and destroyed man【y hous】es."We cannot】 predict earthquakes but \w】e know the seismi【c his】to/ry【 of the i\sland," Bianco continued. "The 2017 event i】s not\ linked to m【agm\/a【tic phenomena but we kno/w that, due】 to the presenc\e of the volcano, a】/nd its w/eigh\t, the isl】and is low\e/r【ing causing fr/act\ures. It is obviou/s that v】olcanic dynamics increase the seismic risk 】of【 Isc/】hia."The earthquake al/so highlighted just how difficult it can be to ma\na/ge an emerg\ency on the island. That ni\ght ab】out 20,000 people 【&mda/sh; l/ocals a【nd tourist【s &mdas\h; came to the\ port 【to be ev】a】cuat【ed but there we【re not enough ferries.Neverthe【less, th\e Ischitans do no【t seem to \worry t【oo m\uc\h a】【nd\ f】ace the/ risk 】with a t/ouch of typic\ally Ne【apol】ita\】n fatalism."We literally l/i/ve on f】ire, we p【ut ourselves in the hands of the Eternal Father, what/ 【else shoul【d we do?" an elderly gentleman, wh】o /sells cheeses and mozzarella on the roadside/, s/aid."You see,【 we 】are surrounded by the 【sea, 【where shoul】d we go? If there is an】】 eruption we die on t\he island or at sea, it\ is impo】ssib】le to 】leave he\re qui\ck/ly," a【nother inha【bitant said.'No integrated plan/'Fabio Matter\a, from the local Ci/vil \Pr\ote【ction, told Euro【news \that "there is no i\ntegrated plan【 on the is//land】 fo/r erup\t/ions and【 earthquak\es," despite【 the fact /that "th/e 2017 /】shoc/k ca【u\ght】 us comp\letely un【prep\are/d【.\""There is no in】/tegrated plan of the islan】d for】 eruptio】ns and earthquakes. 【The shock of 201】7 has caught us 】completely unprepared," explains 【Fabio Mat\ter【a of t】he local Civ】il Protection, while 】he\ sh【】ow\s me the small opera/ting r\oo【m 】o/bta【ined in an a/ncient therma/l centre used for ot【her functions/."Th/e Campania】 region has recently【 issued a tender for the municipalities to finance 】evacuation plans. Now 】every singl\/【e【 muni/】c【ipality should work out its /own plan,"\ he】 sa\】id, labelling it "nonsense""If t】he/re is 【a disaster i】t will involve the 【whole island and/ the/ strategy 【shou【ld be common," he concluded.Fran\cesco Emilio Borreli】, regional councillor for the/ Green party has 【been critica\l of the lack o】】f pre\paredness for years."】The 【three a\reas obs【erv】ed by【 the /INGV 】a】r\e【 very urbanised,"\ h】e flagged. "Vesuvius inv/olv【es】 700,000 people, there i】s\ an evacuation plan but the exercis】es】 are no】 longer carried【【 \out.】""In Pozzu/ol】】i (Campi Fle/gr/ei) they have created an ev】acuation plan and h\a/ve begun to 】do/ some test【s but we ar【e v】ery f【ar from the possib【ility of actuall\y saving 500,000 people. In/ Ischia/ there app】e/ars to be 】little interest from anyon【e,/ perhaps t/hey think\ tha\t\ it is impos/sible to save i/ts【】 inhabitants,/" /he went 】on.Men \vs naturePhe【nomena such as 【/ear/thquakes and volc/a【/nic eru/p】tions are often 【\unpredictable and dep\e】/nd on nature but some \of the serious consequenc\e】\s of the earth/quake \of 2017 can be attributed exclusiv\ely to human action.T【he volc/an【i\c areas/ of the Neapo【lit】an territory have face】d w/\ild urbanisatio】n over th/e years with administra/tio\ns that rarely managed to opp\ose buildi/ng sp\eculation.Vesuvius, Campi F/leg\r】ei and 】Ischi\a are home to over 1%】 of the Ital/ian\ popula【tion, exposed\ 】【to pos\sibl】e cat/astrophic ev\e/nts \without the p\ossibility of ra【pid eva】cuation.A well-known risk that did no/t prevent the pop】\ula】ti【on of Is/chia from 【growing ex/ponentially from 23,511 inhabita【nts in\ /1861 /t/o 34,201 in 196/1, and 64,031 in 2016.Over the /l】ast 】50 years】, urbanised areas on/ the】】 island ha】ve g/rown from 9% of the 【/whole/ territory \to 30%, a figure thr【ee times highe\r \than the nation【al average,\ accordi【ng t/o researc/h【ers from the U【niversity of L'Aqui\la.\/【 Ev【en \tourism【, after a brief decline following the e\arthquake, is g【rowin/【g ag【ain, with over 3 mill】ion ann\u/al visitor】s."There【 are\ d\oze\ns of magnit【ud\e 4 earthquakes i】n Italy. The one in Ischia o】f 2017 is the onl/y one /I ca\n \remember havi【ng caused s】im【ilar damages\ \",【 Bianco explained. "The damag【e of this pheno【menon, in th】is\ 【case/, is to be attributed 】more to \h/o/w men\【 have decided to/ build than 【to nature,"【 she con【cluded.'Single\ muni】cipality'For\ Bo/relli, the situation is】 【"rea/lly deadly"."We have a simila】r situation to】 Japan, we are talking about 【the are】a】 with the/ highest number of volcanoe/s in 】Italy and at the same time\ the mos】/t\ densely populated and highly 【urbanised, with th\e gr】eatest\ anthro【pic pressure and the highest /rate】 】of illegal activity," he stressed."The absen】ce of an evacu//a【tion pl\an for Ischia】 is explained by an irresponsibl/e policy. N【【ature is cyc\lic/\al, we\ know that we will f【ace other】 earthquakes, perhaps \an e/ruption, it may be/ in a ce\ntury, in a millennium. W\e should have a pol】i/cy that loo/ks to t\omorrow but it would be necessary 】】to pu【t admini【strations and citize】ns in f/ront of t/he fact that some areas must be co\mpletely evacuate【【d," he continued.【A fisherman told【 Euronew】s on the s\hore of t/he p】o\rt tha】t a/ single【 admin/is/tration should be c/reated to come u【p wi/th a single evac】】uatio/n 【plan /】for t】he whole island a/nd t\h】at the mayors o\f/ th【e six municipalities should, th】erefore, wo\rk together."I think that i\f they do\n't do it, n【ature will/ do what we can【't do: Epomeo will explod】e, ma/ke six lavas【 of fire and fi\nally】 make a single municipality," he said【.Share 】t\his articleS【hare\T/weet\Sha】re/send】Sha\re/Tweet\SharesendMoreHideShareSend/ShareSha【reShare/\SendS【har】eShareYou migh】【t also li】ke 】 \ 【 】 /Ita】lian【 brid/】ge【 colla】ps\es injuring only/ 】one\ as lockdown condit\ions red//uce traff】【ic 】 】 【 Ita/lian d【o/ctor treats/ corona】virus patients【】 at h【o/me 【 】 【 / / 【 【 】/ Baskets of【/ s\oli\da/r【ity lowered/ from Na\ples balconie\s amid】 coro/na\viru/s chaos 】 】】 \Mo【r【】【e aboutVolcano eruptionItalyEnvironmental prote\ctionEm/er//gency / 【Brow【se to】day s\ tagsText si【zeAaA\aHaving cricket tacos or fried Man\churia/n scorpi/ons on the menu of your favourit【e organic and susta【in【able resta\/【urant ha/s a pr】etty good 】chan【ce in 】the futu【re.【 E【dible insects are on/ the/ r\i】se, t【hey are becomin】g more and more popular f【or nu【tri】tion】a】l/ reasons\ and f/or environmen/tal b/enefits./\According to a r】e/port of Global Market Insights,【 the global edible\ i【ns】ects market s/\ize is /expect】ed to grow f/r【om o/ve【r $】55 mi【llion in 27 to】 over 0 million by 2024.In 】the We【stern part of the】 wo】rld, the gastronomic argument is on the go wh】ile many】 hig】h-e】n】d r】estaurants joine】d it alr\eady, such as the multiple winner of the Wo】rld’s B【est Restaurant, Noma】 in Copenhagen, which h】ad become widel】y kno/wn for its efforts to make】】 in【sects as an acc】eptable food】 fo【r th\e futu\re. Another temple of hi【gh-en/d g】astronomy, S&atil】de;o Paulo&rsqu/o;s D.O.M., ranked the ninth best re/staurant in】 the】 】world】, made headlines a fe/w years ago by s】erving a r\aw/ Amazo\nian leaf-c/utter ant on a pi\\neapple cube.In an era in which】 concern o\ver the world'【s climate only c\ontinues to grow deep【er/, experts 】are re】g【ularly encouraging extreme and pe】rhaps even creative action. Hence advocates of/ edible in/sects ar\e singing the/ en/vironmental】 benefits of s\prinkli【ng your di】she【s 】【with crickets, grasshopp\ers and ant【s】.B】ugs p【ack a lot of protein and minerals but take 【far f\/ewer reso】urces /to produce than animal meat/.Click on the vi\deo above 】to learn more abou\t 】the\ high-end ins】ect dishes 【serv/ed in New York City/.S】ha】r\e\ this 】\article / \ More from wellnessAn international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gsA stretch of coastline in sout】hern Italy 】is lead/ing the way i】n su/s】tainability – with some su/rprising benefits/.Tor\r】e\ Guace【to was once a centre】 for p\/oor fishing practices, cigarette smu【ggling and a dro】p-off point 】for illegal\ immigrants.But that all\ began to change when the area was designated a marine protected rese【rv】e.The dunes】 a\nd wetlands along the /coastline are no【w a precious stop-off point for migratory birds and/ a permanent home to many local species. Eco-tou/r\ists are also flocking to the area.Local】 businesses are bene【fiting 【too【,\ boo【sting their s\ales by 【associ/ating their/ brands with the now famou/s Torr\e Gua/ceto 【p】rotected area.Corrado 】T】arantino, P/r/esident of】 the Torre Guace\【to mana】gemen\】t cons】ortium, told【 O\cean h】ow i】t】】 【all came\ about【.“W\e progressed from blas\t fishing in the past to a sust\ainab】】le fishing mo】del that /is now copied】 and\ reproduced around/ the/ world. Every year, peop\le 【/from Italy and fro/m ot/her 】countries com\e【 here t\o vi/sit/ and 【learn about our 【app/r\oach, which proved/ itself eco【】nom【ical\ly su\st】a/inable.&\ldquo;Th\e fis【he\r】men\/&rsqu\o;s【 cooperative lives on &mdash【; but now it’s \also e\nvironmental\ly【 sustainable, \as it prevents depopulation /of the sea.“/With 【regard to agricultu【re, it/ m【ove【d from incre//asing its/ /production by very intensive us\e of che/micals to e】stablis】hing an organic 【Torr/e Guace【to label for products that are now f【amous around the wor\ld — suc【h as the 【local olive【 oil or th\e ty】pic/al local s\o/rt of t\omatoes, &lsq】uo;Pomodor】o Fiaschetto&r/squo;, which h/a【ve bee\n rediscovered, re【fined and are n/ow grown /here o\nce again.“As 【for tourism — w【e are certified und/er 【the Europea】n Cha\rter \for Sus\taina】ble /Tourism in Protec】t\ed Areas that includes all the tourist s/【ites and ho【te【/l faciliti\es. It\ shows that i/t&rs\quo;【\s possible to r【emai\n profita/【ble/ wh】ile 】ful\ly respecting lo】cal nature and 【life.&ld\quo;And we w/ant to show 【that a\ll this i【s not only poss\ible in t/he areas that have \joi/n\ed in th/e Torre Guac/eto Consortium, b/ut all around the world. Because we&rs】quo;re convi\nce\d tha】t this would benef】it e】verybody, making ev\eryone’s l【ife much better.&/r】dquo;Share t【his 】articl\eCopy/paste the article v】id/eo embed link below:Co】p/ySh】are】Tweet【SharesendShareTweetS\haresendMoreHide/ShareSendShare\ShareSha/reSendShareShareYou migh\t also\ l\ike Ti】d】e】 turns for /】an Italian coastal wasteland / 】More aboutEnvironm\ental pro\tectionFauna and FloraFi】sherySea \ 【 \ \ Most viewed 【 】 【 Wha\t influence o\n/ climate/ is the coronavi】rus lockd】o/wn re】ally havin】g? 】 \ 【】 \ 】】 / The new AI system safeguardi\ng【 】】/prem】】a\ture babies from infection】 / / 【 】 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may teach 【our bodies to beat cancer Apple a\nd Google say they'll work togeth】】er to trace /spread of 【coronavirus】 【via smartphones \ / 】 【 Ho\w E】U funding is chan/ging t【he/】【 f/ac【e o】f L\/atvian innovation 【 】 【 \Bro\wse today【's tagsH\alf of mille/nni【als would tak\e a pay /c\ut to save the plane\t/Coronavirus/ latest: Donald【 Trump halts/ U/S payments to World Health /Organiz【a\ti】o】nThe world economy will suffer 】its\ wors/t year 【since】 the Great Depression of the 】1930s, The Inte/r【nati】onal \Mon】etary F\und 】has said i\n i/ts l】atest forecast.The IMF said on【 Tuesd】a【y that it e/xpec\ts the g\lobal economy to s【hrin】k 】b【y 3 percent this year. Thi】s is far w\orse than the dip of 0.1 p】er】cent in the rec/essi/on year of 】2009 after\ the \financial crash.The glo\bal economy i【s t\hen expected【 t/o rebound with a 5.8 per\c】\ent grow/th in 2021, but that outlook is【 un【certain.&l【dquo;This is an unprec/edented sh\ock. We have shutdowns of important se】ct\ors o】f th【e\ econ\omy. 】As you re/-open sectors, you start from a very lo\w base, bu\t ec【onomi\c activity【 gradually come/】s bac】k,” Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, de】puty dir【【ector of/ the IMF's research de\partment, told/ Eur/onews.The bl\eak assessment represents 【a breatht\aking downgrade by the IMF. 【In January, before the【 C\OVID-19 】outbreak /emerged as \suc【\h a grave gl\obal threat, the internat】ional lending organi/s【ation fore】cast modest growth of 3.3】 /p【【【ercent this year.Howev【er, far-re【aching measures to co【ntain the pandemic -- lockdown】s, tr\avel restriction\s】\, \busines】s shutdow】ns /and social dist\ancing -【- h【ave suddenly br】ought 】economi\c activity to a near】-standst/ill."Becau】se the economic fallout is acute in specifi/c sectors, po【licymakers will need to impl【ement substantial ta/rg【\et【ed/ fiscal, m\onetary, and f\】in【an】cial ma】rket me【as【ure【s to support affected ho【useholds and businesses domestically,"【 the IMF say】s.The IM\F say/s Europe -- the epicentre of the/ pandemic -- has been pa【rt【icularly \badly hit. Eco】nom【ic c/ontractions of\ 7.5 percent ar】e e\xpected in 【t\h【e eur\o zone's 19 countries, and 6.5 percent /in t\he United Kingdom.】&ldqu【o;\The reason for the very, very sharp downgrade c】om\pared to other 】countries is simply that the epidemi】\c h】as taken \a much larger tol/l】 so fa】r on Europe than/ it has on】 other parts of the world,&rdquo/; Milesi-Ferretti said in a\n inter\v/i【ew with\/ E\【urone【ws'】 busine\ss editor】 Sasha Vakul】ina.&ld/qu/o;T】his is why【 it is so ess】ential for governmen/ts t】o take/ really dracon】ian】 measures to keep firms from going bankrupt, to k/ee】】p workers from losing their wages\. This\ is/ also a very l【ar\g】e investment that yo【u are makin【g /int【o preparing/ t/he ec/onomy to res】】tart," h\e /said.】World trade i\s pr】ed\icted to\ plunge 【by 11 per【cent t【his【 year b【efore growing by\ 】8.4 【p/ercent in\ 2021.【The IM【F ac\compa【nies its foreca\sts\ with a warni\ng that there are many unknown factors: inc\luding t】he pa\t/h the virus will】 ta\k\e, the effectivenes/s of \policies take】n t/o cont】ain the outbr\eak an\】d l【imi【t the economic damage, and uncertainty over the situation severa/l /months fro【m now.Share\ this article【C【opy/paste the【 article video embed【 link below/:CopyShareTweetS】hares】endShareTweetShare\】se】ndMore/HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also like\ 【 \ Coron】】avir】us in E【urope: How will the EU/ €5】00bn 【rescue deal help pe【ople and bu\sinesses? / / 【 \ / Coro\navir\us va】ccine: P\【h】arma giant】s\ G/S/K/ and S/anofi team up to【 find COVID-19 solution 【 【 Sur/vivors o】f cor】onavirus on their experience/ - and【 thei/r【 new perspective 【 / / 】 More aboutCorona\vir】usIMFFin\a【\n【cial /ai/dEcono】myHot 】Top\ic/Learn more about Coronav【irus Hot \To\picLearn more about/ Coronavirus / Browse today's/ tags,见下图

We /spea】k 】to【 s/oci\al \anthropologist Mathilde Hojr【up】 Autzen abou/t how a Dani/s】h fishing c【ommu/nity】/ is now t【hriving a【fter ne【arly bei\n【g\ wiped out by f/ishing /quotas】.【Share this articleCo】py/paste the article video embed link below:Co\pyShareTw\eetSha【\resendShareT】w】eetS【haresendMoreHideSha【/reSendShar/eShareShareSendShare/ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 Depleted fish sto【cks can’t wait. The】 E】U and Norway need to commi【t t【o ending overfishi【ng now ǀ V/ie/w 】 【 】 【 \ Activist/s are rais【in\g funds to sav】e【 Danish wooden boats / / //More aboutF\i/sheryEnvironmen/tal【/【 protectionDenmar/k 】 \ / Most\ viewed 【 \ 】 // 】/ What influence on cl\ima\te 【】is the /c\orona/virus lockdown r/eally having? \ \【 The new AI system safeguard\ing premature babies from i】nfecti\o【n \ 【 【 】 Messenger RNA: the m】olecule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer / 】 \ Apple and Google say they'll wo/rk together to trace sp【read of coronavirus via sm【ar\tphones 【 【 】 】 How EU funding is 【chan】g】ing the f】【ac【e【 of Latvi】an i【nnovation\ 【 】 Browse today's t/ags

【At the frontline of an 【Ext/inction Rebellion climate protest i/n】 BerlinText sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/esThe Ol\d Port, Mars】eille\’s popular wa】terfro/nt, h\ides a dirty secret.Electric scooter【s, tires a【nd pla】s】tic bottles litter 【【the seafloor.Annual clean-up operationEver【/y 】【ye】ar, volunte/e/rs gat/her/ to clean up some of /the mess. Hundreds of scuba divers collect th/e \rubbish, whic】h is t【h/en【 sor\ted\ an【】d rec\ycled, or otherwise safely dispose/d】 of,【 by 】l】oc\al activists.&ldqu】o;We find a 【lot of【 scooters, ra【i【ling【s, cans, bottle【s,” says Angie Espine【l Caño【n, 】a volun【\t/eer with// Team 13. &ld【quo;The goal【 i【sn&rsqu/o;t just to clean up, it&rs/quo;s also to 】ra】】ise awareness】.&r/dquo;“Last year, we recover【ed 91【m3 /of \waste,” s/ays I\sabelle P/oi】tou/, anoth】er volunt【eer f】】rom the Merterre Associa/tio\n. “The year【 before it】 was 13】1m3, so \that’s a decrease of 40m/3. This/ year, j【udging \from what I c/an s【ee】 and my experience, \I’d say it&rsquo】;s les\s again."We fin】d a lot /of scooters, rail/ings, \cans and bot/tles. The goal isn’t just to clean up, it【’s also to raise awareness. 【 Angie Espinel Cañ/【on / Vo【luntee】r, Team 13 】 With smu\rfs 】for ma】scots, the\ event】 i【s】 a part of the "EU Be】ach Cleanup" campaign -\ h【elping to raise aw//areness of the Europe/an response /to th】e\ marine p】ol【lut/【i【on pro\blem【. One o/f【 the divers is Alai\n Dumor/t — 【the EU’s representa/tive in Mars/eille.“Some 】waste is potentially 】recyclable,&rd/quo; says Dum\ort【. “But 【unfortu\nately 【【not/ sin\【gle-use objects, which go strai\ght in the bi/n. That's why from 2021 the /EU /will 】be banni\】n/g all this kind of single\-use utensils &\mdash; pla】tes, s】tir【rers, cotton bu【ds, /and so on - all the things yo/u fr【】equently find on be】ac】】he\s will be banned.”Mos】t ocean waste co/mes from urban areasAn imp\ortant aspect of the campaign is public outre/ach. Mi】【llions 】of tons of/ waste - mostly coming from u/rban are\a】【s - 】en】d /up in \the ocean 】every/ yea\/r】/.】 It’s been calc\ulated that on every square】 mile /of ocean, thous【ands of piec】es o\f rubbish \are floating./“The fig\ures【 【show that【 80% of marine li\tter originates on land,” ex\pl】ains Olivier Bianchimani/, th】e dir】ector of Septentri\on 】Environneme\nt. “It'【s eithe【r w/ashed away【 by 】/rivers or dis【carded/ d【irectl】y into/ the sea. As you can imagi\ne, it wasn't wind that brough】t r/ailings and bicycles /here.”At \over 【7【0 beach cle】an\up eve【nts organised t\his year b【y the EU a【nd the UN, almost 40 /000\ participants collect\ed ar】ound 】850 ton/s of waste &md\ash; from Camb【/odia to Haiti - and Argenti/】na to】 No【rway.The】 figu/】res show 】\】that 80% of ma/【rin\e litter ori】ginates【 on la/nd. 【 【 【 【Ol【ivier Bianchimani 【 【 Director, Septent】r/ion】 Environnement 【 &ldqu】\o/;This needs to be s/een i/n a【 much broade\r c【ontex】t,&rdq【uo; says Dumort. \&ldqu\o;Ot】herwi【se t\】his would be a loca【l event,【 and you’d be asking \wha\t's】 Europe go【t to do with it. Europe's involved/ precisely because this is a globa】l problem, and 】requi】res a whole s/eries 】o】f a/ct/ions and laws a】t an i】nternational l\/e】v】el.”The Euro/pean Union is\ leading the globa】l 】fight \aga/inst marine li】tter.【 Be//sides its 【policies curbing single-use p\【lastics【 and re/ducing waste from lost fishing gear, the /EU has earmark】/ed\ €350 million for research an【d deve【lopment.Mini-cata】maran scoops】 debris from t\he wa】ter\One/ of the EU-supported tec/hnologies is WasteSha【rk,【 devel【oped in Rotterd】am. A re\motely contr\olled 【m【in\i-catamara】n removes plastics /and othe【r floating deb【ris from【】 the surface of t/he water. Its sen【sors can monito【r pollution levels and \other environmental indi\cator】s. It's electri\call/y powered, emission-\free and ca\n collect hundreds of】 kilos of rubbish/\ at a time.“What we'/re】 trying to do is 】create a \small /enough vessel that will 【get into ti】ght spaces w\here waste col\lect\s, particularly in ha/【rbours and ports, and s/top all【 that waste bei【ng taken out into the greater ocean," says Richard Ha【rdiman, the 【founder on Ranmarine T\echn】ologi/es, the startup behi】nd WasteShark.【The bas】ic function of the WasteShar【/k is very simple. But \ins】ide, it【's a】lways changing &mdash】; 【we【're al【ways trying to make it lighter, mo\re eff/icient/, ea】s\ier to do maintenance on. \ /T】\essa Despinic \ 【 / WasteS【hark】 Design Engineer \ 【 】 / \Ranmarine alrea【d【y has c】us】t\omers in s\everal countries. Enginee【rs ar【e workin\g to make the d\evice\ ful【ly auto\nomous — so it】 can\ c】ollect litter and br\ing 】it back t/o the /recharging station /wi【t【h the need for a pilot.“The】】 basi】c \【【fun【ction】 】of the Wast\eShark is very simple,” says 】d】esi/gn engineer Tess\a Despinic. 】&ldq【uo;It just s】wi】m\s around and collec\t\s【 【tras【h from the su】rface. B【u\/t inside, it's alwa\ys chang/【ing — we're【 \always trying to mak//e it 】\lighter, more effic】ient, easie】r to 】do maintenance\ on. And we're also【 building a\n a【utonomous version t/hat will swim \aroun】d according】 to/ waypo/ints that yo\u give it. So w【e're a\lways wor【king on th】at and】 maki】ng it better.】"I\n the near future\, the de/velop/e】【rs envisage swarms 【of their rob【ots \picking up floa/】ting rubbi/【sh.“I have\ /a】 vision in my hea【【d that keeps m\e】 going,” says Hard/iman. “Tha/t is what we'd be sitt/ing in a\ c\ontrol room an】d from our site, we could see whe】re e/very drone is acros【s th\e planet, how many are【 operating, how 【/much waste is bei\】ng caught — an/d actually see the real impact 】of 】that these things are ma【king around the wor】ld."Technical s【【olutions an】d clean-up campaigns are important. But the simple way】 to keep our se【as】 \hea】lt【hier is to\ drop less litter — a】】nd】 tha【t’s】 a lesson for childre\n and/ adults alike.121212121Share\ t/his articleCopy/past】e the a】rticle v\】id】eo 【embe【d li】nk below:CopyShareT/weetSharesendS/har【/】eTweetSharesendMo/reHideShareSendShareSha/reShareSendShareShareYou migh】t also like \ / 】 Wha/t/’s killing/ ou\r und】erwater ecosystems? / 【 Mor\e 【abo\【utContamination of wate【rEnvironmen\tal prote】ctionSea Most viewe/d 】 \ 】 W\hat influence on \climate is 】the coron/avirus】【 】\lockdown really having? 】 【 【 \ The new AI system saf/egu】/【arding pre/mature /babi】es\ from infect\io\n 】【 Messenger/ RNA: 【the mo/【lecule that may teach our bodies to beat c/ancer 【 】 / \ 【【 【 【 Apple a】】nd Google /say they\'ll wor\k toge\ther to trace spread of cor】onaviru】s vi\【a smartphones / Ho/w EU fundin/g is ch\anging the f/ace of Lat】vian innova/ti/on / Brow【se today's ta/gsDub】ai acts to ste【m the 】ti【de of single use plastic“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207What can your smartphone do for nature? 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsFi】nding gold i【n t【he gu【tt\ers of 【Brussels,如下图

Danish fisheries take back contr】olNe】w edible in-flight meal t/ray designed for【 plane jo】ur【neys

Text sizeAaAaOn 】the】 one hand, one of 【the bigg\est environmen/tal issues in the European\ Uni【on\ is how to reduc//e food wast\e and t【ackling issues around water【 s【carcity across the 【supp/ly chain.In the UK alone, food/ waste is e/\stimated to have the【 【value of more than £20 bi\llion (equ\al to &e】uro;.78 billion - approximately the GD】P of Cyprus) 【a year, s\ays UK ch【ar【ity WR】】AP.On 【the【 other/ hand, textil/es acco\unt for】 a 【/quarter/ of the environmental pollution in the region.So when it come\s to\ s【ustainable clothing, foo/d can play an impor】tant role, and /the\re ar】e already some outstanding 【examples 】out there starting from an innovative natural textile made from pineapple leaf 【&\#642;bre to ma】king\ \milk fibre.Th\e latter i】s made 【from high concentrations of casein, a milk prote\in. In fact】, /the【 techn【i\q\ue is not /ne/w. \In the 】&l】squo;30s, I】talian ch【【emist and/ e【ngineer An/tonio Fer\retti came up wi【th/ the idea 【and patented it under t】he】 na\me, L/anital\. Howeve/r, \the m\arket so\on mov\ed on to cheaper/ synthetics.It【alian fashion/【 designer An/tonella Bellina dusted off this old /tech/n/ique for her new ran】ge.Cl【ick on the vid/eo and \see how /she make\s fabric out o【f milk in T【usca】ny.\Share】 this【 ar/tic【l/e / More from 【style

如下图

山西环保T】ext sizeAaA/aOne ma【n's t】ra/s\h is\ another\】 man's treasure/ - and some people 【build a house out of it. F\or example, thousands of glass bottles can make an ent】ire hous【e\ or chapel, such as Edou】/ard Arsenault's Bottle H\ouses in/ Cape/ Egmon/t, Pr\ince Edward /Island, Canada. He used 2】5,】000 mul【ticoloured bottles to erect t/hree buildings in 】the /'80s. Today it \is a must-see tou/\rist】 attraction.If ther/e is no glass, plastic \bottles can make /a very 【fi\ne alterna\tive. After losi\n【g her\ h【ouse in an earthqua/ke in El\ Salvador, 】87/-yea/r】-old Maria】 Pon】ce【 built a new\ home with \plastic bo/ttle【s, which 【she h【ad】 collecte/d throughou】t se/ven 】months from roadside trash.Maria Be【rsabe Po/nce, 87, st/【ands outsi】de he【r hou/s】e made out】 of \plast/ic\ bottles in the vi】llage of El Borbo】llonReuters/Jose CabezasWood,】 rocks and even an old bus can m\ake a very u】n【ique house,/ such as \the【】 one in Japan, /pho/tographe【d by Christoph Ru【pprecht, a geographer【 from Australia, according to who\】m, this quir/ky house【 \】was built e\【ntirely 】ou】t of discarded trash an\d recycled materials.House made entirely ou/t o\f recycled materials in JapanFlickr/Christoph Rupprecht】Unable\ to find 】【a【 suitab【le/ house,【】 Egyptian Ta/ymour 【El】-Had【idi 【made a big step toward【】s his dream of having/ an environ【mentally friendly home in 2012. /Four years】 /la\ter he【 moved int\o \a small castle【 in Cai【ro, w/here /all the walls, ceilings, windows and \even be【ds are ma【de of rec\ycled\】 material such as discarded concrete block】s, red bricks \a/nd glas/s bot【tles.If yo/u do not have concrete or d\iscarded bricks,】 a few thous/and g\l/a/ss bottles \can be of \h\elp. Si/ngle \mother Ivon【e Martins made a DIY home in \B\【r【azil using\ thousand】s of discarded bottle【s.Hit play the vid\eo a】bove to learn more about these homes m/】ade of garbage.Share thi【s a/rticle M】ore 【fr】om lifeGra/pe skin leather\ is one of the】/ alternativ/es. \Life under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tagsHow to make your start-up busi/ness sus\tainable from day one

Eu/ro\】pe ha【s a \plas【tic problem\, o【\nly 30% of plastic wa/ste is re/c【ycled

How/ is the【 UAE ta】ckling its food waste problem?【

1.星力手机电玩游戏

More than 】160 \people kil/led for d】\efendi/ng the environment:【 campai】gn/ groupT】ext sizeAaA/aOne ma【n's t】ra/s\h is\ another\】 man's treasure/ - and some people 【build a house out of it. F\or example, thousands of glass bottles can make an ent】ire hous【e\ or chapel, such as Edou】/ard Arsenault's Bottle H\ouses in/ Cape/ Egmon/t, Pr\ince Edward /Island, Canada. He used 2】5,】000 mul【ticoloured bottles to erect t/hree buildings in 】the /'80s. Today it \is a must-see tou/\rist】 attraction.If ther/e is no glass, plastic \bottles can make /a very 【fi\ne alterna\tive. After losi\n【g her\ h【ouse in an earthqua/ke in El\ Salvador, 】87/-yea/r】-old Maria】 Pon】ce【 built a new\ home with \plastic bo/ttle【s, which 【she h【ad】 collecte/d throughou】t se/ven 】months from roadside trash.Maria Be【rsabe Po/nce, 87, st/【ands outsi】de he【r hou/s】e made out】 of \plast/ic\ bottles in the vi】llage of El Borbo】llonReuters/Jose CabezasWood,】 rocks and even an old bus can m\ake a very u】n【ique house,/ such as \the【】 one in Japan, /pho/tographe【d by Christoph Ru【pprecht, a geographer【 from Australia, according to who\】m, this quir/ky house【 \】was built e\【ntirely 】ou】t of discarded trash an\d recycled materials.House made entirely ou/t o\f recycled materials in JapanFlickr/Christoph Rupprecht】Unable\ to find 】【a【 suitab【le/ house,【】 Egyptian Ta/ymour 【El】-Had【idi 【made a big step toward【】s his dream of having/ an environ【mentally friendly home in 2012. /Four years】 /la\ter he【 moved int\o \a small castle【 in Cai【ro, w/here /all the walls, ceilings, windows and \even be【ds are ma【de of rec\ycled\】 material such as discarded concrete block】s, red bricks \a/nd glas/s bot【tles.If yo/u do not have concrete or d\iscarded bricks,】 a few thous/and g\l/a/ss bottles \can be of \h\elp. Si/ngle \mother Ivon【e Martins made a DIY home in \B\【r【azil using\ thousand】s of discarded bottle【s.Hit play the vid\eo a】bove to learn more about these homes m/】ade of garbage.Share thi【s a/rticle M】ore 【fr】om lifeHow to make your start-up busi/ness sus\tainable from day oneMussel fa/rms 】fight a\g【ainst【 pollution in \the Baltic; one of the \most polluted seas in the worldText 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from places

2.星力手机电玩游戏。

A/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tags\Clima\te change i/s\ makin【g Arctic waters more access】ib/le to/ vessels, 】\raising the c\on/troversial prospe【c】t of more ind/ustrial-\scale fishing/. On the lates/t episode of】 \Ocean, Euronews】 looks at what'\s being done】 to prev/ent\ /the】】 threat to \the 【A】rctic e】cosystem.Greenland i】s warming\. Among/ other thi【ngs,\ this【 means long\er f】ish【ing seasons. Be/tween the ic///ebergs o/f Iluliss】at, it&rsq【uo;s 】a gold ru/sh. Fish\ing boat】s equipped with【 mo【dern machinery pull up hundreds of ki/los of catc【h every d/ay.Ilulissat fisherman Marti】n J&os【las/h;rgense\n is worried:&ld【quo;There】\’s too much fishing goi【ng on around here】. It’/s so p】rofitable\ now that al【【l the】 b/ig 】】fish h【ave been taken out; we’re catching smaller fi/sh now”.Sleds, dogs and boatsTo be\ closer to buyer/s, fisherm\en are moving from 【coastal villag/es to ci\ti【es. 【The【 population of Oqaatsut, an \Inuit s\/ettlement on Greenland’s west】 c/oast, ha/s f】al/len to less th/an 30 people. Sle】d d\ogs, tra【ditionall【y us】ed for【 ice fishing and 】huntin/g, have been d【ecimated i/n man/y commu/nities, as th【e 【w\ar】/mi\ng climate makes bo【at/s mo【re usefu【l than dogs.&rdquo/;The sledding 【used】 to start in【 October," say/s/ Oqaatsut fish【erma/n Steen Gabr/ielsen, "but now that there’s not eno【ugh ice, we ca【n just use bo\ats all year round.&r\dquo;Arctic Se\a Ice Reaches 2019 Minimum Extent\C\hanging ecosystemAs the seas \get war/mer, new species of fish are finding their way to Greenland&】rsquo;【s c【oa/sts —【 【the/se include mackerel, herring, At/lantic \bluefi】n/ tuna and cod. But not every\one is ha/ppy. \The fishermen say t【heir most profitable catch — halibut — /is getting harder to find during the warmer pa/rt of th【e year.“Halibut li\kes cold water," explains Niels Gundel/, a /fisher\m【an 】in Ilulissa/t.【 "As summers /b】ecome warmer and longer 【it moves away, to stay wher【e【 it&rsq】uo;】/s【 c【\ool.”Immin\ent/ dan【】gerI/n the fut\ure, retreating sea i】ce an【d /changes in/ fish stocks could bring commerc/ial fish】ing fleet【s into th】e unprotected international wate】rs a】/round t】\he North Pole.Scien/t\ist】s a\【re sounding t】he alarm: unregul\ated fishing could destr】oy the poorly studied e】cosystem of/ the Centra/l Ar【】ctic Ocean】, where fish can b】e sparse and essent】ial to the s/urvival of】/ other【 animals.In a bid t\o stave off t】his imminent thr\e【at/, the European Union br【ought all\ main parties togeth/er in Ilulissat to agree on】 a c/】omme】rcial fishing】\ ban 】in the Arc/tic hi\gh seas\ for at least 16 ye/ars.【T【his land/mark internati】onal a】g】reement was s/【igned by the EU, C/anada, C\hi\na, Denmark (inclu/ding Greenl】and and【 the Fa】roe Island/s), Iceland, 】J【】apan, the /Republi】】c of Kor\ea, Norway, Russia and the U\nited States. Together, thes\e 【pa\rties represent some 75% of gl【obal GDP.Arctic cat\ch 2017Under this legally bindi【ng agreement, /the 】C/entral Arctic area - roughly the size \of the Medit【er/】ranean Sea - will remain off-limits for 【f【ishi【n\g fle【ets, at【 leas】t unti/l scientists con】firm\ that fishing i】n the r\egi】on can be done su【stai】nably.Preca/utionary ap【proachAt the Arctic \University of Norway in \Troms/ø, Professor To\re Henrikse/n he\ads the】】 Norweg\ian Centre for the Law of the/ Sea\.&l/dquo;T\his agree\ment/ is reflect\ing the precauti/o】nary a】pproach, that whe/n you// ha【ve little or very\ inadequate /\inform\/ation you should act\ cautiously \and only reg【ulate, and adapt the regu/lation, according to 【the in【formation/ you have," Professor Hen\rikse】n explains. "P】reviously, 【you started fishing, /and then you regu】late it. And th】en at 【that stage,】 it could b\e too late.”/Map\ping the Arctic se/asThe【 futu】re of the】 ban 【will depend on th\e find\ings o/f the scien/tific c/onsortium le【d by pro】fessor Pauline /Sn】\oeijs Leij/onmalm. Sh】e heads a\ t】eam of European researchers on the MOSAiC expediti】【on — a year-long silent ice drift close to the North \Pole.Onboard th/e Polar\stern icebreaker“Normall【y, wh\en】 【the ic/ebreak】er mov【es through 】the\ \ice, you w/ill/ not get good acoustic data,/ because th】ere/’s too much sound fro/m t【he i/cebreaker. No/w we&rsquo【;\ll have a whole year \】o\/f acoustics, and it\ 【is just a d\ream!&/rdquo;As w】【ell【 as using sona/r, the /\EU-suppo//rted r\esearchers will rec】ord vid/eos with a deep-water【 camera, take environm】ental DNA sam【ples at various depths, a/nd for the f【irst time catch some Central Arctic fish.】MOSAiC Exp/edition/'s d\eep-water/ re/search camera“We will\ be able to a/nalyse its stoma\ch, 】its/ stable isotopes, i/t【】】【s fatty ac\i【ds," Profe】ssor Leijonmalm says. "It will tell us 】about the 】he】alth【 of the fish, and where/ it has com\e/ from because \fish mi\grate — so we /w【ill have a 】lot of info】rmat【ion, just by having/ a fish in our hands.”The disco【veries of thi\s \and fu\t】ure】 expe【ditions will deter\mine wheth【er fi【sh】ing /\in the Central Arctic Oce\an /can be done sustainably &mda】sh; or whether \these h/igh se】as should remain untouche\d for the dec【ades to come.】To wat】ch th【e f【ull epi\sode of /Ocean, click on 【the media pla/yer above121212121212121212Share this/ articleCop】y/paste the article 】【video embe【d li\nk below】:CopyShareTweetSharesen/dShareTweetSharesen【dMoreH/ideShareSendShare【ShareShareSendShare【ShareYou might als\o like \ \ 【 】/ 【 \ EU fish/ quota q\uarrel\ - ministe/rs hail d\ea/l, NGOs slam overfishing 【 【 】 \ 【 \ 】 Watch: Thirty-】five years of Arctic thaw in\ tw/o minut/es / / \ 【 】 【 S】cientists have embarked fro】m\ /Norway on the longest-ever expedit/ion to the /Arctic 【 【 【 More ab/ou/tGlobal warming and cli】mate change【FisheryArcticEnv\iro】nment\al prote/ctionGreenland 【 /\【 【 Mo】st viewed 【 【 【 / \ 【 \ \ What infl\uenc】e o\n climate is/ the coronavirus 【lockdown \r【eal【【ly havi】ng? / 】 The new AI system safeg】【uar/d\【ing premature /babies fro/m infecti\o【n \ 】 【 】 \ 【 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may/ teach our b【odies to beat cancer【】 \ 【 】\ 【 】 \ A】pple a】nd Google 】say they'll work toge【ther【 to】 trace spr】ead of coronavi/rus via smartphones \ // 】 How EU funding is chan【ging t【h\e face/ of 【L】【atvi/an in】novation\ 【 【 Browse tod【ay's\ tagsThe 【import/ance of res】【toring mar\ine biodiversityBy 2050 around 80% \o/f th/e w/orld's po/pula\t】ion w\ill 【be【 living i\n urban areas.【Currentl\y, they occ\upy【 3% of the Earth's】 surface but produce around 72% of gr/eenhouse gases.Gro\wing urba【nization along with climate change will have a 【seriou\s impact on 】o/ur life in /【citie】s in\ ter/ms o\f air quality, warmer tem】peratures and high\er 】【floo】【d 【risk.But /so【lutions 【to reducing the environment\al impact and i【mpro/ving people's quali【ty of life\ ha/【s been found i/n nature/.Scientists【 working at the European project UR\BAN Gre\en-Up【 in Va/【【【l\ladoli】d, /Spa】i//n are te/sting Nature-\Based Sol【utions (NBS) that could a【llow sustain】able urban development.【Involvin\g 25 partner\s from 9 countrie\s /and 8 cities, the p】rojec/t found that the】 key is in th/【e natural properties which ca】n be employed to】 mitigate climate change effects.URBAN 【Gr【een-Up proj【ect coordinator, R\a&uac\ute;l Sánche】z Fr/ancés, explains】 【that some plants can wo/rk as a therm【o-re/\gul】a/to】r and reduce the temperature of 【s【urround/ing【s./"For th】at, we have solutions like green roofs, mobile v\ertical garde】n \or green\ f/aca/des."An im】【por【ta【n】t part of/ t/he project is dedicated to 【th】】e tr【e/atment of air\ an\d】 rainwater in cities.S】pecific type/s of plants, thro/ugh】 their leaves and roots, can work \as natura\l filters."/That solution is an urba【n biofilter," sa/\ys Franc&eac】ute;s】/\. "We used /to call /it green \【chi\mney. We want【 t\o install it on the roof close to the chimneys to clean up th/e】 【【output of\ combustion.""This system is able 【to mainly catch n】itrogen oxides an【d 【\【part/icu【late matter, the two m\ain pollutants 】issued by vehicles and heating systems.The po【tential of nature-based sy【\stems is significant.For example】, in Valladolid a cycle \lane and a】 g【ree】n pavem/ent could pre\v\ent the emiss\ion\ of n/early 200 tonnes CO₂//; and reduce \te/mperatures by 5°C du/ring summer.But the cit\y&\r【squo;s configurat\ion 【/is】 a 【fa/ct【or to】 deal with/."We h】\ave to solve some iss【ues, the main one is t】he lack 】\of sp】ace. Then, w】e \also have problems 【【with o】ccupy】【ing public spaces, b/ecause we 】have unde】【rground w【ater【 pipes, e】lect/ri\c n【etwo【rk, underground p\arking," says Alicia Villazán Cabe【r【】o, a s】enior e【nvi/ronmental consultant at Valladoli【d city 】council【.Valladolid, /Spain, Izmir, Turkey and】 Liverpool, UK are the /three front r/unners 】citie】s wh【】】ich are t/e/sting more than \forty na【\ture】-based methods.Liverpoo】l【 is a city with huge traffic density: 1.35/ b】illion /vehicle】 miles were travelled on】 its roads in 2018 acc\ording t\o officia【l statistic//s.B【ut solutions like arboreal interventions, for instance, are ex】pected to r【educe carbon】 emission【s by 5.55 tons p】er ye】ar and te】mpe/rature】s by 2-4°C during 】the summer seas】on."We have issues \wit【h air q/uali\/ty in Liverpool. We【 /h【av【e a few hotsp】ots 】\around the ci【ty so \【these\ trees will hel/p us clean up 【there,"【 says Fernando N\u/&/nt】ilde;ez Veiga, the/ divisi\onal /ma】nager for majo//r\ hi】ghwa】ys/ projects at Liver】/p】o/ol city /council."The trees are just pha】se one. We ha/ve planted 1 trees//, the p【lan is to plan【】t more than 150 trees.【 That wil/l h【elp \to clean /up this area."The b\【irthplace of Be】atles is implementing several tail\ored strategi【es, /such as green routes, bio pollutant filters, 【pollinator gardens, and sust/aina】ble dra【inage\ systems to reduce the impact of flood risks.【"What we a】r】e looking to】 do is to put thes/e 】green】 interventions into the right place in the c】it【y; \we wi【ll be】 monit【ori\ng air qu【alit【y, water quality, biodivers【ity, looking \at wellbe/】ing/, people’s percep】tion of/ the \area, and /loo\king a】t some economi/c indic【ators as well," sa\ys Juliet Stapl】es, a s\enior pr【ojec【\t manager for URBAN \【Greenup 】at Liverpo\ol c【ity coun/cil.Once the whole set of nature-/based【 s【oluti【ons】 is 【v【alidated, it will be transf/erred to a\nother five cities; Mantov】a, Italy【; L【udw】igsburg, Ger/man【y\; Medellin, Colombi/a; Cheng/du, China; Binh Dinh, Vietnam and \replicated all over the world, to green up our more/ and more overcrowded urb【an areas.1212121212121212J/ourn\alist name/ • \Katy Dartf\ordShare this articleCopy/paste the artic/le video embe\d li】nk below:CopyShareTweetS\haresendSh/areTweetSharesend/MoreHideShareSen/dSh】areShareShareS【en\dShareShare】You might a】lso like 【 / Smart farming: how tec【\hno\logy is i】mproving animal welfare and efficiency in agriculture 【 \ \ / / 】\ 】 / Can d】rones help/ greek olive oil producers【】/? / / \ Captu】rin【g CO2: How to\ reduce ca/rbon d/ioxide/ 】emi】ssions 】from the ceme】nt indu】//stry / 】 】 More aboutEnvironmen\tal prote】c【tionEcologyScience【 \ Most vi】ewed \ / /【 】 Wha】t influence o\n climate/ i【/s /th\e cor【onavirus lo\ckdown rea\lly hav\i【ng? 【 【 】Th【e\ new AI system safeguarding pre\ma\/ture babies from/ 【infection\ 】 \ / Messenger RNA/: t\he molec/ul\e【 that may teach【 our b【od\ie\【s to beat cance/r / / Apple and Googl【e \say they'll work together t】o 【trace spread】 of coronavirus via sma】rtphones 】 How EU funding is chang】ing the fac】e of Lat/vian innovat/ion 【 【 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ life

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Text siz【eAaAaStar//ting】 a new business/ i\s an/】 exc【iting time, as you emb\ark on\ your entrepr】eneur【ial/ fut【ure w【ith passio【【n and/ dete】rminat【ion\. For many of u【s, n/ew ventures【 often have sust】ainability as a focus. Whether it/&rsqu【o;s【 a dr【ink, a/ clothing brand, jewellery or a café【;, many of us want commit 【to a sustainable ethos as part of our /brand. But what about our //own sustainable effort/s? After all, 】you can’t set up an eco-/focused b\rand and then n\ot pay attentio/n to the sustainabili】ty】 of your own 【working\ day. We asked experts f\or advice o/n how to be a susta】inable】 start-u\p【, from day o】ne\. Make your launch party and gifting\ susta】inablePl【anni】ng an event/ and 】gifts for customers to welco【m【e your n【ew \‘business/ baby&rsq\uo; into/ the【 world is all very well, but you n/eed to do it in 【an /eco-friendly way. Bec E/van】s is author of How to Have a Happy Hustle. She advises, “m】ove\ away fro/m bub【ble wrap envelopes, and th】ink about bi\odegradable \goody【 bag/s – and no glitter balloo/ns! 】/Think about【 plastic in gi/fts and plas\tic waste when giftin\g. It&r\squo;s a】bout showi【ng intention &nd\ash; when you set up a \business\ it’s abo\ut building a community \and workin\g w\ith ea【rly users. Think ‘do【es t【he wor/ld really n】ee/d this?’&rdq\uo;.R/ela】t【ed | 9 susta】inable economy startups a/【i】ming to\ cl【ean up o/ur future 【Make su】stainability\ a &ls】quo;/given’, not a &lsquo/;must】 do/’Jesse Tran and So\n Chu are fellow students from Vietnam who\ 】are s/tar】t】i\ng their own trainer bus】iness and their p】roducts are made f】rom recycle\d coffee cups. \Stu【dying】 in Finland, t【hey saw 】clear】 diffe/rences in 】the way thi】n\gs wer】e produced and /the/ sustaina\ble】 the way of life. The【y&rsq】uo;ve channelled /that into\ their【 brand, RENS. The pair started using an organic cott【on bu\t【 realised this would have/】【\ an environmental impact an】/d so switch】ed to a\ new fabric.\】 &l/dquo;As /millennia【ls, for 【us sustainability shou\ld be a given\,&rdquo/; sa/ys Jess/e. “We want t】o p【lay a 【role as ambassa/dor/s &nda】sh; it【&rs\quo;s /easier to liv【e a sust/ainable life in Finland!”/Rel】ated |The brands launching sunglasses mad/e fr\om human hair, milk bottles \a】nd coffee waste View this post on I\ns】ta【gramRens are【 best sh】ared with \frie【nds! #renshipA post shared by/ Rens Ori\gi【n\al (@rensoriginal) on Aug 19, 2\019 \at 9:0How Western wi/ll Sa】udi Arab【ia go t\o【 attr】act tourists?a\m P/DT【Think ab/out【 the entire prod/uction chainSo you&/r】squo;ve c/hosen your start-up./ Now to find】 a way to produce】 the 【product】. Sustaina\bility needs to be considered from start /to 【f\inish. Paul Turton i/s the Man】aging Dire】ct\or at Pact, a lead\ing speciality coffee s\erv】ice. He reveals that \they know customers are more likely/ to choo/se a brand or product that h】】【as【 purpose at the he\art of the business, so you should 【consider making this a k】ey /part of your company proposition.“S/ustainability is one 【of our\ core values, from t/he \farming wor】kfor/c】e in t\he co/untries/ w】【e buy our/ coffee/ from, to the /far/ming pra\ctices, ethics, shippin/g【, wa【/rehous】e【\s and roasting of the co】ffee,” he says. &l】dquo;It wouldn't be r】ig】ht to ask peop/le to work in 】a【 way that doesn't s】how us up】\holding our own standard/s - /no ma/tte/r the 【size of our busines\s.&rdqu\o;Jesse and【 Son fr\om Rens agree that their biggest tip【 is to 】find 【a g/ood/ sustainable base】. They work /from Aalto universit】y. &ldq】uo;Th【e lights are/ all aut/omat/ic, and\ everything is optimis/ed【/\,” sa】ys Jesse.Is your office space susta/i/nability-f【r】iendly?According to Bec Evans, “happiness is the j\ump】ing-off】 point【 【【for【 becoming a\ &lsq【uo;si】\d】e h/ustler’, and one of】 the reaso/ns si/de hus\tles are growing 】so 】much is \b】ecause you】 can work /from【 /anywhere\.” So\ that/&】rsquo;s a g】ood place to s\tart 【&n】dash; is yo】ur chosen place /of work】 sustaina】ble? Whether it’s at home】, a 【co/-w】ork/ing【 space o\r ren/【ted of\fic\e, y\ou need】 t\o c\onsider everything from the recycling p】\olicy to energ/y use.Susan Steven\s, /a CEO and Founder o【f/ 【M/a/de 【with R【espect ad/ds, “balancing between business objectives /and sus【tainability is ve【ry hard】 in the modern wo【】r【ld. \Our current【 business \model i/s b【ased \on con\】/sumerism, brands fighting for more an\d more】 sales, making customers buy thing【s they don【’t n【e】ed and have \t/【o th\row t【hem awa/y 】i/n a mon】\th or two.\ App】r\oxi\m】ately 1.3 bil\lion tons o/f 【wa【ste is 】prod】uced globally each year, this numb【er is ex【pected to increase to 2.2 billion tons p/\e/【r year by 2025】. This is alarming.”R】elated /| 5 s】tunning examples/ of/ g\reen architecture around the worldCommit to /recyclingThis may f\ee\l li\k\e /a more obvious one,\ but recycling can get forgotten 【when \you&rsquo/;re wonderi/ng abo【ut the provenance of the /cotton for those new bags you’re mak【ing\. Keep/ a kee【n eye on the re\cycling \opt】ions at your wor【kplace and of your prod\uct, expert【s sa】y. Paul Tur】to\n/ adds, &ld【quo\;it&rs】quo;s good 【to get into good /habits fr【om t/he start, then when the busi\ness/ gro】ws, it’s already ingrained in t】he cult/ure/. People don&r\squo;t o\ften r】ealise【 you can 】even \recycle used coffee grounds, it’\s best\【\ to seek out/ sup/pli【er/s【 who 】can help you do this, we use First Mile\ Rec【\ycling】 a\n【d Bio-Bean 【or simply \get a compost【 bin in the o【ffice.&r/dq/uo;First Mile founder】 and CE\O, Br】uce Bratley, adds, “when it 【com】es to recycling, it【's【 i】mport\ant to remember that no【t all was【te companies deal wit\h wa】ste in the same w【ay. 】It'\s essent【ial t\o ide\nt/ify one tha\t will\ continue you】r sustainabi\li【ty effo】rts aft【er you/r waste leaves yo\ur pr】emises to 【avoid it ending up in landfill sites where it will pr【o【duce green】h【ouses gases, such as metha】ne.”\Fi【】nd people who】 are on the sa\me sustainab】ility /page as \you\Wo/\rking with like-minded peop【le will mean y【ou】 develop \a st】rong sustain】ability】 mantra across the d\ay and into the future. David Ke】lly, Gener\al Manager \for \Eu【rope, Middle East and】 Africa a【t Deputy】, a co【mpa】\ny /that w\orks with】 lots of start-ups, s\ays, &\ldquo;to grow/ sustainably and /re/tain talent, you need/ to b】rin\g people on the j】ou/r/ney with you.】 Pay th/em pro【perly a【nd\ on time and prove wor】k w/il/l fit into their\ lif【e. In/ve\sting【 in tools that allow you to /d】o【 thi】s wi\l【l bu】ild 【trust amongst a dedicated work【f【】o【rce who /will be your en\gi】/ne fo/r grow/th.”/Buy 【second】 hand\ supplies and th】ink about packagingHow exciting is it when yo】u】 start\ a ne【】w business t【】o 【go all out on the stationa/ry, fun new pens, plant pots, 】desk ch\intz and \fancy envelope【s? Right? B】ut all these things are sustaina\bi【lity nightmares. You 【know a【bo/ut fast fashion, but you also ne】ed to【 b/e awa\re of &ls】quo\;fast stationary’\./ Step away from the p/en\s - you’\ve /go】t lots at home already./A/nd that goes for /machines as\ \well as pens, adds Jason Dow\nes, MD at PowWowNow,】 &ldquo\;when businesses are sourcing /off】ice】 equipme】nt, the/y sho】ul\d s【eek appliances with \a】n ENERGY 】STAR label, which【 indica\tes that the equipment\ has achiev】ed ener/gy efficiency \sta【ndards set by the EU./ 】Computers, for example, us/e 30-65 percent les\s electricity, while there are also\ greener alternatives for a lo【t of t】echno】l\ogy, such as/ energy-【efficient l\i\ghtb\u】lbs or solar-pow\ered】 smart】 speakers.&】【rdquo/;】Ros【alind Rathou【se run】s a s】ustainable cookery \school.】 She says, “when setti】ng up/ the \office of your ne\w bus\iness or start-】up,\ don&\rsquo;t be tem/pted to buy everythin/g new/. 【\Recycle where you can, use Fo【\rest/\ Stew/a】rdship Cou】ncil produc【ts and/ choose s\ustainable energy provider】s. Incorporate 】sustainability processe【s from d\ay one an\d emphasise/ the im【portance of waste management and re】ducin/g plastic.”Think about y【our energy supplierBills【 aren’t the mo\st glamorou】s t】/】opic, but choose the right ene\rgy sup】plier; you could save money as well as the p\lanet. B/ruce Bratl\ey ex/plai\/ns, “there i【s a growing】 r】ange 【of fully renewable energy pro\viders that 】can /pow【er your busi】ness withou【t creatin】g 【/extra/ greenhouse】 gas emissions, and even green web【 hosti/ng companies with renew【abl/e energy a】nd carbon offsetting s】ch【emes. Bu【sinesses can\ sav/e resourc\es】 by ensu【ring th】at they're signed up to pa【perle【ss【 billing for all of t\h】eir bills.【 Devel/oping gre【en habits in the 【workplace is/ easy\ and ca\n have a \signi】fica【nt impa】ct, f\or exampl\e, m【akin/g sure lig\hts and screens aren't being left on】 needlessl/y, using publi\c transpor】t to】 /g】et to me\etings and making sure e【veryo\ne \has easy access to】 【recycling bin/s.”Th】ink\ abo【ut em【otiona\l susta【inability, tooOnce you】’ve done /all you can】 to be sustain\able with the pr【acti/cal things, you need to th】ink about your own mental well【being, to【o, /adds Bec Evans. “A\ lo\t of people set up side h【ustles because/ they 】are solving problems in【 some way a/nd I s】peak to【 a l\ot【 of peop\le in areas of health \and mental wellbeing who fee\l the pro】ble\ms 】/they see a/ren’t bein【g solved. /Talk to customers /and /ask/ them wh\at they think./ Be t\rue\ to your values. If sustain【ability is something that mo/tivat/es y】ou then it&\rsquo;s important to】 check y【ou’re in 】l】/i【ne with your 【/own va\lues.”W】ords:/ Jenny S【ta【llardShare/\ this article M【o/re from lif/eDefo\restation in 【the Brazilian Amazon \rainforest went up by 13.7% between August 2017 a【nd\// /July 2018【, accordin】g\ t【o the \coun】t【r/y’s\ Natio/n/al I/nstitute for /Space Researc\h (I\NPE).The INPE】 said that【 becau/se /of the incr/eased/ deforestation,\ Brazil had lost a\ total area of 7.900 km&/sup【】2; of rainforest, which G\reen【peace Br/azil estimates is c】lo\se t\o a million】 football pit【ch【es or five times the 【\size of 【London — Europe's larg/est city by\ area.Brazil has t】he\ largest】 sur/face of the A】mazon rain【forest in South Ame【rica.Our pic\ture gallery shows 【the scope of deforestation this pa】st year /in Brazil's Amazon for】est/....New Gallery 2018】//28 © Christian 【Bra【ga / 【Green】peac】eo【riginal/date 1/1/0001 6:00:0/0 AMwidth \】1200he\igh】t 801 &cop【y/】; Christian Braga \/ Greenpeaceoriginaldate 1/1/00/01 6:00:00 AMwidth】 2】5】/00height/ 16REU\TERS/UESLEI MARCELINOor/iginaldate \/1/1/0【001 6:00:00 AMwidth 6720heigh/t 4480 © C/hristian Braga /\【【 Gre】e】np【eacecameramake NIKON C【ORPORATIONfocal/length 24h【ei/ght 800fnumber 6.3exposu/retime】 0.】00062【5alt: 2/60lat【: 【/-10.754733【l/ong: -68.743800】c【/amerasoftwa【re Adob【e\ Photosho】】p Lighoriginaldate 10//3/2018】 3:50:36 PM\width 1200c\ameramod/】el /NIKON /D850 © C/hristian Braga / Greenpeac【ecameramake NIKON CO/R【PORA】T/IONfocal】leng】】th 31height 800fnumber 【10e\xposuretime 【0.000】al【t: 240la/t: -9.8】9893/3long: -68.710900camerasoftwar】e Adobe】/ Photoshop Lighor\iginaldate 10/3】//20 5:32:40 PMwidt\h 1200cameramo【del NIKON D850 © Christian Braga / Greenp/ea【cecam】eramake 】NI\K\ON CORPORATIONfocallength 95he【ight 800fnumber 4.5\exp\osuretime 0.000】625cameraso【ftware Adobe Pho】toshop L【ighorigi/naldat/e 10】/2/2018【 9:43: PMwidth /1200\cameramodel N\IKON【 D850According to Gr【eenpeace Brazil, the /cause for 】the i【\ncreased defore/station lies in】 【Brasilia with the government.The NGO blam\es the rural lob\by i【n【 C【ongress for\【 &ldqu】o;threat\ening the rainforest, its peop】le,\ and the planet’s climate&【rdquo;.The l【obb】y’】s agenda incl【udes promo/tin【g farm/ers’ rights, expa【nd\ing】 arable lan\d in the country, and opposes the e【xpa【nsion of indigenous lands, according to 【\【Brazilian me【dia.“This set o】f pr】opo【s】als benefit those who want t【o destroy】 the rainfor【est, g\rind l】an【d】\, and steal the natur/al】 heri【\ta【ge of the Brazilian peop【le. The consequences are translated into 】the a】moun【】t of\ destruction/ in the Amazo】n,” said M\arcio Astrini, coor/di/【nator of public policy for Gre/e/npeace 】Br/azil.Brazil's 【environment minister/ Edson Duarte said i/n 【a statement】 that illegal logging was the main fact\o【r for 】the increas【ed de\forestation. While Brazil's Cl/i\ma/te Ob】servatory, a net】【work of NGOs, said in another statement that ap】art fro\m/ illegal loggin\g it was the growi】ng】 commodities s】ector that was\ c【on/tributin\g to fo【re【st destruc】tion. The green NGO also w/arns th】at the environmental politi/c】s of Braz】il's ne】w presiden【t【, Jair B【olsona\ro, co\uld furth\er devastate the 】rainforest."He's\ said \that\ he would put an end to protecte【d areas【, to lands reserve】d to indigenous communities, that h】e would reduce inspections /and sanctions aga/】in/st e】nvironmental cri】mes. Every】thing that reduc【ed def【orestation 【before. If he 【elimin\ate】s】 all of this,/】 it would trigger a【n unimaginable si/tuation," said Astrini】.Euronews has reached out to【 G】ree【npeace Brazil for comment\ on th/e current defore/station of Br\az\il's Amazon ra】in】forest.Share this articleShareTweetSha/resendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShareSha/re\Send【Sha【reShareYou might a\lso \like \】】 Watch:】 Footage of uncontacted Amazon t】ri/be m】emb/ers e/merges/ as /deforesta【tion expands \ \ \ \ 】 【 Amazon wildfires: Wh【y is\ the South /Americ/an rainforest 【so important? 】 】 \ 】 / Amazon fires 】generate smoke clo】ud almost a/s \bi\g as devastating\ Siberia blaze \ 【\】 //M\ore a/boutEnvironment\Envir】onm】ental protectionBrazilAm\azonia 【 Browse today【'\;\s tagsDepl\eted f/ish stocks can’t w【ait. The EU and\ Norway need to commit to ending over【fishin【g now 【ǀ ViewTex/t sizeAaAa】Dutch/ ad/ve\n【tu/rer Wiebe Wakker left the Nether】lands in an\ e】lect】ric car, the \B\lue Bandit\ \on\ the 15th of March 20/1【6 to /complete/【 th/e long/es】t \journey in an ele【ctric car ever【 recorded. His goal /w】as to sp/read /th】e world o/f sustainab/i【lity a\round the wor【ld, w】hile inspire, educat】【e\ an\d accelerate the t【ransition to a z\ero c\arb】on future. A beje/gyzés megt】eki【ntése /az Inst【agramonWiebe Wakker 】/ Plug Me In (@plugmeintravel) &a【ac】ute;【l\tal megosztott bejegyz&\eacute;【s, &A\ac】u\te\/;pr 7., 2019, időpont: 1:24 (\PDT idő\;zóna szerint)To bring about this mission he re【lied on the kindness and help of the p\eop【le around the glob/e, hence his/ in/itiation, called 'Plug Me/【 In', has /bec/ome th/e collaborati/on b\etween p】eople. Eventu】ally,\ those contributing by offering f\ood, accommodation or 】electricity, wer】e the ones choosing /the path that he ha/d to take. Hence,】 he was sent to Ita【ly via】 Germany and Switzerl/a\nd, after that to Sc【a/ndi【navia to eventuall\y \reach the Nort】h Cape and go \back south vi】a Russia, t】h【e Baltic States, Poland【 a【nd U\kraine.】 Followin】g that he hea\de】d to Iran and【 kept goin【g un【til Sydney, Au\stralia/.Cl】ick on th】e video abov【e to learn/ 【more abo\ut this adventure.Share this】 article More from places

4.Text s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellness。

Coronavirus/ latest: Donald【 Trump halts/ U/S payments to World Health /Organiz【a\ti】o】nThis episode of【 Inspire /Afr/ica features 】a non-government【al organisation 】in t\he Republic】 of Congo, /which has embarked on a mi\【ssi【on of su\pportin】g rural \commu【nit/ie【s an\】d 【empowering them to】 contribute to the protection of /the count】ry’s bi\odivers【\ity. We】 also tak】e a tour\ \t】hrough Nigeria【\ /w\here wom\en /are revolutioni【sing/】 the world of f/i】ne arts.Share \this articleC\opy/pa\ste the article【】 video embed\ link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShare\TweetSharesendMoreHideS【h】areSendShareShareS\/h\areSendShare\ShareYou might 】】also l\ike 【】 【 】 】 F/ire】\ engulfs market in N【igeria's commercial capital L/agos 】 【 \ 【 At least 65 kille/d in Nigeria Boko Haram attac/k - state TV \ 【 / 】 / \// If the EU won'/;t stop the s】low murd\er of "N/ige/ria&】#039;s G/a/ndhi", perhap【s Bri/tain\ can/ ǀ View 】 / 】 \ More aboutNig【【eri\aRepubl】i】c of CongoArtEnvironmental p\rotectionWomen Browse today's tagsT/witte【r react【s to police ba\n o/n E\xtinction 】Rebellion pro【tes\ts in Lond/on。旧物回收

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